Dee Finney's blog -9-29-2011 -page 49 - Parkinson's Disease

 

BEAIN

THE BRAIN

 

 

Dee Finney's blog
start date July 20, 2011
Today's date September 29, 2011
page 49

TOPIC:   Parkinson's disease
laying on of hands healing

 

 

9-29-11 - DREAM- I  was living somewhere in Milwaukee, WI.  I caught my two orange cats eating a package of raw hamburger in the kitchen.  I grabbed the cats and tossed them on the floor and threw away the rest of the hamburger package, knowing my husband would be mad if he knew the cats had eaten most of it.

I got out another package of hamburger out of the freezer for dinner, then went after the cats and found another package of raw hamburger on the floor more than half eaten by the cats.

I grabbed hold of the big old cat and put him near th either orange cat, thinking I was going to toss both cats outside, when a male voice in my head told me that the old male cat had some kind of disease and that the younger female cat had Parkinson's disease.   I wondered if there was some kind of connection, and noticed that the female cat had shook her head oddly right at that moment.


My Aunt Ruth  came into the house, and I told her about the cat incident and the Parkinson's disease, and she insisted that I go with her to visit an old lady who lived in the apartment complex nearby and lay hands on her and pray over her and cure her Parkinson's disease as well.

I knew that the chances of my laying hands on the woman and praying over her wouldn't guarantee curing her Parkinson's disease wouldn't cure the woman, though it wouldn't hurt to try, especially if Aunt Ruth went with me and was praying too.

So, I agreed to go with her and pray over the woman. 

When we got over to the apartment complex, the old lady met us in the hallway where two young couples were giggling and going into another apartment together, and the old woman said, "Peew !  They just had sex!"  That told me she must have an acute case of sensitive smell because I knew what the gigling and activity meant, but didn't smell anything on the women as I went past them.

When we were finished praying over the old woman, we wished her well, and went back home.

I woke up and immediately had a vision of a long green piece of paper which told alll about Parkinson's disease.

NOTE:  I was told on the radio a couple weeks ago that Hillary Clinton won't run for President again because she was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and she hides it by hanging onto things with her left hand to hide that fact.

Michael J. Fox has had Parkiknson's disease for many years and testified to Congress about it, and he is under treatment, but nothing has cured him.  He still has it.  I'm sure someone along the wee has laid hands-on him to try  to help him.  Why wouldn't he be cured when he is now the expert?

*********

Parkinson's Disease Alternative Medicine

Hope is a powerful thing. Without hope for a better future, the will to live is lost and recovery, no matter what the affliction, is impossible.

Imagine then, being told by your doctor that you have a progressive and degenerative disease that robs you of the ability to control your own body. A disease for which there is no cure.

This is the reality for those diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.

Hope is offered in the form of medication such as Levodopa. Levodopa acts to restore levels of dopamine in the brain. The lack of dopamine is the primary reason for the symptoms associated with the condition. Since it first began being administered in the 1960's, it has lessened much of the suffering experienced by millions of people throughout the world, and is recognised as the "gold standard" in medical treatment of the disease. However, it can not completely reverse the symptoms, and like all drugs, is more effective in some than others.

Consequently many have sought hope in alternative treatments. Parkinson's disease has been a recognised ailment in virtually all cultures since ancient times. Many of these ancient treatments are becoming popular in the west and are increasingly validated by western medicine.

Ayurvedic medicine - This has been practiced in India for 5000 years. Parkinson's symptoms are mentioned in ancient text under the name Kampavata. Ayurvedic medicine is a comprehensive system placing equal emphasis on diet, exercise, meditation, massage and herbs. One such herb, Mauna Puriens, is gaining attention in conventional circles as its effects mimic synthetic Levodopa, with fewer side effects.

Broad beans- Australian researchers discovered that broad beans are also an extremely effective natural source of L-dopa. The highest concentration of L-dopa is found in the pod so they are most effective when consumed whole.

St John's Wort- Dopamine influences positive feelings in the brain, and since dopamine levels are low in Parkinson's patients, depression is often a symptom. St John's Wort is a herb that has been used in Europe for many years. It has been proven to be effective in alleviating depression and insomnia.

Botulinum toxin A- This is a bacterium that causes food poisoning (botulism) but has proven to be effective in reducing hand, head and voice tremors when in a weak solution.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - This has been shown to have an effect on the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease, however it is unclear whether it actually slows the disease or simply temporarily alleviates symptoms. The drawback is the massive dose required. The effective dose is approximately 1,200 milligrams a day, well above the 60 to 90 milligrams recommended by many alternative therapy advocates.

Acupuncture- Used for centuries in China to correct energy disturbances in the body. It has become a popular method of treatment for Parkinson's sufferers the world over. So far there are no placebo controlled studies that show acupuncture can treat the motor control symptoms of the disease, but there is some evidence that it can assist with sleep disturbances. There is much anecdotal evidence to suggest that it may be effective in increasing feelings of well being and relaxation.

Massage- While not treating the symptoms directly, it can help reduce some of the discomfort associated with muscle stiffness that is commonly experienced by patients.

Alternative treatments for many diseases come and go. Some become fashionable for a short while only to be discredited and discarded. Others accumulate a growing body of scientific and popular support. It is to a large extent simply a matter of trial and error. Most alternative treatments are harmless, but some herbal remedies may interfere with medication, so be sure to consult your health practitioner for advice.

The content of this web site is intended to convey general educational information and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional healthcare advice. More information.

2002-2009©Parkinson's Disease Information.

Parkinson's Disease Alternative Medicine

Hope is a powerful thing. Without hope for a better future, the will to live is lost and recovery, no matter what the affliction, is impossible.

Imagine then, being told by your doctor that you have a progressive and degenerative disease that robs you of the ability to control your own body. A disease for which there is no cure.

This is the reality for those diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.

Hope is offered in the form of medication such as Levodopa. Levodopa acts to restore levels of dopamine in the brain. The lack of dopamine is the primary reason for the symptoms associated with the condition. Since it first began being administered in the 1960's, it has lessened much of the suffering experienced by millions of people throughout the world, and is recognised as the "gold standard" in medical treatment of the disease. However, it can not completely reverse the symptoms, and like all drugs, is more effective in some than others.

Consequently many have sought hope in alternative treatments. Parkinson's disease has been a recognised ailment in virtually all cultures since ancient times. Many of these ancient treatments are becoming popular in the west and are increasingly validated by western medicine.

Ayurvedic medicine - This has been practiced in India for 5000 years. Parkinson's symptoms are mentioned in ancient text under the name Kampavata. Ayurvedic medicine is a comprehensive system placing equal emphasis on diet, exercise, meditation, massage and herbs. One such herb, Mucuna Puriens, is gaining attention in conventional circles as its effects mimic synthetic Levodopa, with fewer side effects.

Broad beans- Australian researchers discovered that broad beans are also an extremely effective natural source of L-dopa. The highest concentration of L-dopa is found in the pod so they are most effective when consumed whole.

St John's Wort- Dopamine influences positive feelings in the brain, and since dopamine levels are low in Parkinson's patients, depression is often a symptom. St John's Wort is a herb that has been used in Europe for many years. It has been proven to be effective in alleviating depression and insomnia.

Botulinum toxin A- This is a bacterium that causes food poisoning (botulism) but has proven to be effective in reducing hand, head and voice tremors when in a weak solution.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - This has been shown to have an effect on the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease, however it is unclear whether it actually slows the disease or simply temporarily alleviates symptoms. The drawback is the massive dose required. The effective dose is approximately 1,200 milligrams a day, well above the 60 to 90 milligrams recommended by many alternative therapy advocates.

Acupuncture- Used for centuries in China to correct energy disturbances in the body. It has become a popular method of treatment for Parkinson's sufferers the world over. So far there are no placebo controlled studies that show acupuncture can treat the motor control symptoms of the disease, but there is some evidence that it can assist with sleep disturbances. There is much anecdotal evidence to suggest that it may be effective in increasing feelings of well being and relaxation.

Massage- While not treating the symptoms directly, it can help reduce some of the discomfort associated with muscle stiffness that is commonly experienced by patients.

Alternative treatments for many diseases come and go. Some become fashionable for a short while only to be discredited and discarded. Others accumulate a growing body of scientific and popular support. It is to a large extent simply a matter of trial and error. Most alternative treatments are harmless, but some herbal remedies may interfere with medication, so be sure to consult your health practitioner for advice.

?

*********

 

PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Parkinson's Disease — The Dana Guide

By Mahlon R. DeLong
July 2009

sections include: what causes Parkinson's disease?, diagnosing Parkinson's disease, treating Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder that most commonly develops between the ages of 55 and 65. First described in England in 1817 by James Parkinson, PD today afflicts around 1 million individuals in the United States and approximately 1 percent of those over 55; approximately 50,000 new cases are reported annually. The disorder’s cardinal features are difficulty in initiating movement (akinesia), slowness of movement (bradykinesia), muscular stiffness (rigidity), and tremors at a rate of four to five per second. As the disease progresses and these symptoms become more pronounced, people who suffer from it may have difficulty walking, talking, and writing.

The onset of PD, which is typically subtle and gradual, is most often unilateral, affecting only one side of the body, with tremors the most common symptom. In its earliest stages, doctors may miss the diagnosis if a person does not have the characteristic resting hand tremor. Some of the other common earliest symptoms are decreased eye blinking, reduced facial expression, and shrinking handwriting (micrographia). This early period might last one to two years before more pronounced symptoms appear. Tremor, slowness of movement, and stiffness usually cause a person to seek medical help.

 

Doctors describe the tremor as “pill rolling,” meaning the motion one makes in rolling a pill across the tips of the fingers with one’s thumb; it is present at rest and is frequently a source of embarrassment. The tremor typically disappears with movement; driving is not affected early on. Other difficulties are slowness, clumsiness, and increasing fatigue in carrying out normal activities, as well as stiffness, or increased muscle tone (rigidity). A person with Parkinson’s disease typically develops a flexed posture, bending forward at the waist, with the arm on the affected side slightly flexed.

In addition to motor problems, people with PD commonly suffer from depression and anxiety.

 

 Depression affects as many as half of the patients. It may occur at any stage of the illness but is often missed because the decreased blinking and reduced facial expressions that are characteristic of the disease can mask depression. Or it may go untreated because of the inappropriate expectation by both patients and physicians that patients with Parkinson’s should be depressed because of their condition.

 

Up to 30 percent of people with PD suffer some degree of cognitive impai or poor planning—usually with advanced illness, and sometimes proceeding to dementia. But people with PD can develop similar problems from other causes: depression, drug side effects and unrelated conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Doctors must therefore rule out those other causes before assuming that a person’s difficulties in thinking are related to PD.

Sleep disturbances are common in PD at any stage, with many people getting fewer hours of sleep or sleeping poorly. These individuals are often significantly less alert during the day, compounding their other challenges. Many factors may play a role in these sleep disturbances, including side effects of drugs, difficulty turning in bed, restless legs, vivid dreaming, and sleep apnea (the repeated obstruction of breathing). Correct diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbances can greatly improve daytime functioning.

 

Other symptoms of PD include sexual, urinary, and bowel dysfunction. These, too, often respond to appropriate drug therapy. Speech becomes low-pitched and indistinct; the skin may develop seborrhea.

 

The course of PD varies considerably. Those who have tremor as their major symptom may do exceedingly well for a decade, while others may progress rapidly to more disability over several years. Most people respond excellently to drug treatment for the first three to five years, but thereafter enjoy less benefit because of drug-related complications, especially involuntary movements (dyskinesias) and “wearing off” of drug effects.

As the disease progresses, patients have increasingly frequent and severe difficulties with gait and balance. One hallmark of PD is the episodic “freezing” of gait: a patient will be walking and will suddenly be unable to take another step. Postural instability is one of the most disabling and difficult-to-treat features of PD, as well as a major factor contributing to falls, injuries, and dependence.

PD is not generally fatal by itself, but people with the disease do tend to have shorter life expectancies than normal. Especially in later stages of the disease, risks include choking, pneumonia, and severe and fatal falls.

What Causes Parkinson's Disease?

 

PD is one of the best understood neurodegenerative disorders. The pathological hallmarks of this disorder include the degeneration of a small group of dopamine-containing neurons in a part of the brain stem, in a structure called the substantia nigra. Dopamine is a chemical messenger that is released in portions of the basal ganglia involved in the control of movement. Loss of dopamine causes nerve cells to fire abnormally and excessively, which disrupts the functioning of other portions of the motor system that are directly responsible for movement, causing excess neuronal activity in some areas and diminished activity in others. Because these disruptions are so specific to movement, some scientists suggest thinking of PD as a “circuit disorder.” Loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra occurs gradually over many years, and PD symptoms develop only when 50 percent to 80 percent of those cells have been lost and compensatory mechanisms fail.

 

Many researchers are intensely studying the causes of cell loss. For instance, “oxidative stress” caused by cell-damaging free radicals, possibly through abnormal breakdown of dopamine, is thought to be at least partly responsible for the deaths of nigral cells. Excessive accumulation of the protein alpha-synuclein, which is often found clumped in dying nigral cells, is also believed to play a role. Excess iron and other metals are also often found in affected brain regions. The synthetic opiate MPTP can cause Parkinson’s-like symptoms, and, after being accidentally discovered in drug users in the 1980s, became a chemical used to model the disease in experimental animals. Other toxins and pesticides have also been implicated in the origin of PD.

Scientists are also studying the role of extranigral changes in the brain, or those occurring outside the substantia nigra, particularly inflammation and neurodegeneration in the locus coeruleus, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and nucleus basalis.

 

It is generally believed that the vast majority of PD cases result from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors, but the relative roles of heredity and environment are still uncertain. PD strikes men and women in almost equal numbers across social, economic, and geographic boundaries. Studies have shown that the disease risk is higher among those who live in rural areas, drink well water, or are exposed to pesticides. Recent research has uncovered specific genetic mutations in a small number of familial forms of PD. For instance, mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene can cause a rare inherited form, and chromosomal areas known as PARK3, PARK8, PARK9, PARK10, and PARK11 have also been linked to Parkinson’s susceptibility. While this provides new insight into the disease’s causes, it does not in itself explain the vast majority of cases—approximately 95 percent—that appear “spontaneously,” without obvious genetic triggers.

 

How the loss of dopamine in the brain leads to the symptoms of slowness, stiffness, tremor, and the other features of PD has received considerable study. This research has led to new medical and surgical treatments for the disease’s symptoms.

 

Diagnosing Parkinson's Disease

 

 

Parkinson’s disease is a clinical diagnosis; that is, there are no specific medical tests for the illness. Though generally not sensitive enough to directly observe Parkinson’s-related brain changes, neuroimaging with positron-emission tomography (PET) or single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) may help rule out other conditions that clinically resemble PD. These syndromes are often difficult to distinguish from “atypical forms” of parkinsonism or “parkinsonism plus.” These conditions share some of the four primary symptoms described at the beginning of this section, but not all are the result of losing dopamine-producing brain cells. It is important to distinguish PD from other types of parkinsonism because treatment and prognosis differ significantly. Here are some indications that a person’s symptoms are not due to PD:

Scientists are now experimenting with radiotracers and PET to directly track changes in the nigral areas of the brain; many Parkinson’s patients show abnormalities on such scans. Recently, tensor diffusion imaging of the substantia nigra also showed promise. Some experts estimate that diagnosis levels remain very low, with as many as 20 undiagnosed people with Parkinson’s for every known case.

 

Treating Parkinson's Disease

 

Although there is no cure for Parkinson’s, people can be treated effectively for many years with medication, physical exercise, and conditioning. Surgical approaches provide new hope for patients for whom drugs no longer control symptoms adequately. The goal of these treatments is to maintain active functioning and quality of life.

 

Advancing the medical treatment of PD is one of the major accomplishments of modern medicine. Until the mid-sixties, the drug treatment of PD consisted mainly of anticholinergic drugs. These medications are still occasionally used to treat tremors, but they cause considerable side effects: memory impairment, visual blurring, and urinary difficulties. The discovery that people with PD have less dopamine in their brains led to the use of the dopamine precursor, levodopa. On entering the brain, this substance is chemically transformed into dopamine, which acts on the dopamine receptors in the basal ganglia. Levodopa therapy has become a mainstay of treatment. It vastly improves the quality of life of people with PD and has led to a nearly normal life span.

Soon after its introduction, however, it became evident that levodopa does not arrest progression of the disease. Even more problematic, it can lead to drug-induced motor impairment (dyskinesias) and cognitive complications. The introduction of alternative drugs has helped lessen and delay these complications. Levodopa is now given together with a drug called carbidopa, which prevents the metabolism of levodopa in the body. This reduces the side effects of nausea and vomiting and maximizes the amount of levodopa that enters the brain. Newer drugs that directly activate the brain’s dopamine receptors (called dopamine agonists) are now prescribed before levodopa because they appear to delay and mitigate drug-related complications. Amantadine is quite effective at reducing the severity of drug-induced dyskinesias.

 

Attempts are under way to find so-called neuroprotective treatments that will delay or arrest the progression of PD. Approaches that use substances known as growth factors and antioxidants are in this group. Studies using experimental models of PD have shown that destroying the part of the basal ganglia called the subthalamic nucleus can immediately reduce stiffness and tremor and improve mobility in the limbs on the opposite side of the body. This discovery renewed interest in surgical approaches to treating PD. To control tremor and rigidity, doctors can also perform a thalamotomy, in which a small section of the thalamus, a part of the brain that relays signals coordinating movement, is destroyed.

 

Another surgical procedure, pallidotomy, targets the globus pallidus, a part of the basal ganglia whose output leads directly to the symptoms of PD. All these surgeries carry some risk of damage to adjacent brain structures, but recent studies have found that they can be highly effective in alleviating symptoms and reducing side effects. It is as yet unknown how long the beneficial effects will persist.

 

Another procedure, which mimics the effect of lesions without actually destroying brain tissue, is deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS, which has been approved by the Food & Drug Administration for treating PD, uses a device similar to a cardiac pacemaker. The surgeon, with imaging and physiological guidance, inserts an electrode into the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus internal (GPi) that is connected to a small pulse generator placed under the skin. The pulse generator can be adjusted so that the optimal benefit is achieved by varying the voltage, frequency, and pulse duration, a process that usually takes several months. The advantages of this method over surgery include the ability to adjust the generator or stop using it. DBS is generally employed only for those who do not or no longer respond to medication or who suffer from severe side effects. Studies have found that DBS is highly effective for treating PD, working better than standard drug therapy, but carries a higher risk of side effects, mostly of complications from the brain surgery. Interest in the treatment remains high, though, and more than 40,000 people have now undergone DBS surgery to treat tremor or PD.

 

People with PD should consider having surgery before the disease takes too great a toll on their independence, employment, and self confidence. Younger people with unilateral symptoms and intractable drug-induced dyskinesias are the best candidates for surgery, but there is no true age limit or lack of substantial benefit for older individuals. Patients who have developed dementia or have atypical parkinsonism are not suitable candidates. Before they consider surgery, or if they experience complications related to treatment, patients should consult a movement disorders specialist. All surgeries carry risk of severe side effects, including infection and bleeding in the brain, but brain surgeries also can cause neuropsychiatric side effects including depression, personality changes, and cognitive dysfunction.

 

News on Parkinson's

Pesticides Linked to Parkinson’s (June 2008) -- Another large study shows that people with Parkinson’s disease are significantly more likely to report a history of pesticide exposure than are people—including other family members—who do not have the disease.

Facing Up to the ‘New Face’ of Parkinson’s Disease (May 2008) -- An interview with Anthony E. Lang, M.D., who has proposed the concept of Parkinson’s diseases (plural).

Parkinson's Research Moves Beyond Dopamine (March 2008) -- After nearly 50 years of focusing on dopamine, the brain transmitter system that fails in Parkinson’s disease, experts in the field are increasingly convinced of the need to consider other possible culprits to solve the riddle of this disabling neurodegenerative disorder.

TRANSPLANTATION

Another surgical approach to treating PD is to replace the missing dopamine neurons with new cells derived from fetal or other tissue. This approach remains experimental. One of the more promising recent avenues of research for Parkinson’s disease, and for other neurodegenerative disorders, involves what are called stem cells. These cells can develop into the different sorts of cells that make up our bodies. Stem cells can be either embryonic or adult. Embryonic stem cells are derived from the earliest stage of development and have the greatest potential because they can lead to any tissue or cell type in the body. Adult stem cells are found in many tissues of the body—for example, blood, skin, and even brain. These cells can generate all of the cell types of their respective tissues. Blood stem cells, for instance, can become red cells, white cells, or platelets. Adult stem cells appear to have some capacity to cross tissue lines, but less than that of embryonic stem cells.

Stem cells hold potential for medicine in several ways. First, by observing and testing how they behave, we can learn more about how we normally develop and how cellular growth can go wrong, as in cancer. We might also be able to use these cells to create tissues on which we can test new drugs without endangering human (or animal) lives. But most of the public excitement over stem cell research involves the potential of growing cells to replace those the body lacks. Researchers have begun to manipulate human stem cells to produce new dopamine-producing neurons; people with PD, who are missing those crucial cells, could have a new supply inserted into their brains.

There are many challenges to overcome before we achieve such therapies, however. One difficulty is learning exactly how stem cells are guided to become one type of cell or another. Another is figuring out how to graft the new cells in place so that the body does not reject them and so that they work as the brain and body need them to.

HEALTH STRATEGIES WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE

Treating Parkinson’s disease is not exclusively the doctor’s job; the patient can do a lot to stay as well as possible for as long as possible. Here are three things patients can do for themselves.

■ Exercise: For people with Parkinson’s, regular exercise and physical therapy are essential for maintaining and improving mobility, flexibility, balance, and a range of motion and for warding off many of the secondary symptoms that can occur with the disease. Exercise is as important as medication for the management of PD.

■ Support groups: These groups play an important role in the emotional well-being of patients and families. They provide a caring environment for asking questions about Parkinson’s, for laughing and crying and sharing stories and getting advice from other sufferers, and for forging friendships with people who understand each other’s problems.

■ Staying active: PD seems to advance more slowly in people who remain involved in their pre-Parkinson’s activities, or who find new activities to amuse them and engage their interests. In a word, getting joy out of life has proved to be good for health.

Adapted from www.pdf.org (Parkinson’s Disease Foundation)

PARKINSON'DDS D

DISEASE AND DIET

Diet in Early Stages of PD

Tips on What to Eat

From , former About.com Guide

About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed

lkaline Water BenefitsSign Up to Receive a Free DVD and Book on Alkaline Water Here.www.LifeIonizers.com/Alkaline-Water

Worried About Parkinsons?Don't give up just yet. My mom got PD 19 years ago & is still healthy.www.allaboutparkinsons.com

Parkinson's Nursing HomesExcellent Care Paid by Medi-Cal for Middle Class Families! Free DVDwww.NhsCare.com

In the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), no special dietary changes are typically required. You may want however to increase your intake of foods rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants are those chemicals that scavenge and eat-up so-called ‘free radicals’ –- tiny molecules that circulate in your tissues and damage those tissues. Free radicals have a special affinity for cells that produce dopamine. So the greater the number of antioxidants in your system, the fewer the number of circulating free radicals. Theoretically that should reduce the rate of loss of dopamine cells over time.

So what foods contain a lot of antioxidants? Fruits and vegetables -- especially the darkly colored fruits and vegetables. Some examples include leafy green vegetables (such as spinach), broccoli, tomatoes, carrots, garlic, red kidney beans, pinto beans, blueberries, cranberries, strawberries, plums and apples. Tea -- especially green tea and black tea -- contains a lot of antioxidants. Red wine contains antioxidants. Dark juices like pomegranate and blueberry juices are rich in antioxidants.

Omega-3 fatty acids are an essential nutrient for most tissues in your body so you want to make sure to consume adequate amounts of these nutrients. Fatty fish like mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna and salmon are high in two kinds of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). It is probably a good idea to add fish to your diet if you are not already eating fish on a regular basis.

You also need to get adequate sources of calcium, magnesium, and vitamins D and K to strengthen skin and bone. You can usually obtain these nutrients from dairy products like yogurt and milk. You need some amount of sunlight to get enough vitamin D.

Here are some ways to include these healthy foods in your diet:

  • Blueberries, raspberries and blackberries can be stirred into vanilla yogurt for a delicious dessert. Or they can be blended with fat-free yogurt and ice in a blender to make a smoothie. Fruit smoothies can also help prevent the constipation associated with some PD medications.
  • I never liked spinach that much until I found a way to combine it with foods I do like, such as salad or rice or scrambled eggs. Happily I like these combinations better than any of the stand alone alternatives. I stir chopped, fresh spinach, tossed in olive oil into my salads or into steamed brown rice. I also sometimes add raisins to that rice and spinach dish.
  • Carrots are loaded with a potent antioxidant called beta-carotene. Cooked, steamed or pureed carrots liberate the antioxidants or somehow make them easier to absorb. Cooked carrots are often more tasty as well. I like my carrots steamed and then slowly cooked in the juices of whatever meat dish I am having.
  • Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant and is found in some nuts in whole grains. Although studies on the anti-PD effects of vitamin E have yielded only discouraging or mixed results vitamin E should nevertheless be a part of your diet. I get most of my vitamin E from whole grains. I cook and steam some whole grain like brown rice, cous cous or bulgur wheat. Then I add items like raisins or cranberries, chopped parsley or spinach, and olive oil.

Sources:

Weiner, W. J., Shulman, L.M. and Lang, A. E. (2007). Parkinsons Disease, Second Edition, A Complete guide for patients and families. Johns Hopkins Press Book, Baltimore.

Marczewska A, De Notaris R, Sieri S, Barichella M, Fusconi E, Pezzoli G. Protein intake in Parkinsonian patients using the EPIC food frequency questionnaire. Movement Disorder. 2006 Aug;21(8):1229-31.

Parkinson's Disease Alternative Medicine

Hope is a powerful thing. Without hope for a better future, the will to live is lost and recovery, no matter what the affliction, is impossible.

Imagine then, being told by your doctor that you have a progressive and degenerative disease that robs you of the ability to control your own body. A disease for which there is no cure.

This is the reality for those diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.

Hope is offered in the form of medication such as Levodopa. Levodopa acts to restore levels of dopamine in the brain. The lack of dopamine is the primary reason for the symptoms associated with the condition. Since it first began being administered in the 1960's, it has lessened much of the suffering experienced by millions of people throughout the world, and is recognised as the "gold standard" in medical treatment of the disease. However, it can not completely reverse the symptoms, and like all drugs, is more effective in some than others.

Consequently many have sought hope in alternative treatments. Parkinson's disease has been a recognised ailment in virtually all cultures since ancient times. Many of these ancient treatments are becoming popular in the west and are increasingly validated by western medicine.

Ayurvedic medicine - This has been practiced in India for 5000 years. Parkinson's symptoms are mentioned in ancient text under the name Kampavata. Ayurvedic medicine is a comprehensive system placing equal emphasis on diet, exercise, meditation, massage and herbs. One such herb, Mucuna Puriens, is gaining attention in conventional circles as its effects mimic synthetic Levodopa, with fewer side effects.

Broad beans- Australian researchers discovered that broad beans are also an extremely effective natural source of L-dopa. The highest concentration of L-dopa is found in the pod so they are most effective when consumed whole.

St John's Wort- Dopamine influences positive feelings in the brain, and since dopamine levels are low in Parkinson's patients, depression is often a symptom. St John's Wort is a herb that has been used in Europe for many years. It has been proven to be effective in alleviating depression and insomnia.

Botulinum toxin A- This is a bacterium that causes food poisoning (botulism) but has proven to be effective in reducing hand, head and voice tremors when in a weak solution.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - This has been shown to have an effect on the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease, however it is unclear whether it actually slows the disease or simply temporarily alleviates symptoms. The drawback is the massive dose required. The effective dose is approximately 1,200 milligrams a day, well above the 60 to 90 milligrams recommended by many alternative therapy advocates.

Accupuncture- Used for centuries in China to correct energy disturbances in the body. It has become a popular method of treatment for Parkinson's sufferers the world over. So far there are no placebo controlled studies that show acupuncture can treat the motor control symptoms of the disease, but there is some evidence that it can assist with sleep disturbances. There is much anecdotal evidence to suggest that it may be effective in increasing feelings of well being and relaxation.

Massage- While not treating the symptoms directly, it can help reduce some of the discomfort associated with muscle stiffness that is commonly experienced by patients.

Alternative treatments for many diseases come and go. Some become fashionable for a short while only to be discredited and discarded. Others accumulate a growing body of scientific and popular support. It is to a large extent simply a matter of trial and error. Most alternative treatments are harmless, but some herbal remedies may interfere with medication, so be sure to consult your health practitioner for advice.

 

The content of this web site is intended to convey general educational information and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional healthcare advice. More information.

2002-2009©Parkinson's Disease Information.

DO NOT TAKE

STATIN DRUGS

STATIN DRUGS CAUSES WEAKENING OF THE HEART
AND CAUSES PARKINSON'S DISEASE

DO TAKE THIS

CO-Q 10

START WITH 100 MGs OF co-q 10

it isi hard on the stomach so increse the dosage slowly

increase 100 mg per week until you get to 400

then increase it only once a month until your stomach

gets used to the grease in it.  The stomach doesn't tolerate

the grease in the pill very well - thus you must increase

only once a month after 1200 mgs, then ncrease only once

every 4 months or so.

3,000 mg of co-q 10 will cure Parkinnson's disease as well as

give you heart the tone of muscle it needs.

most people do not have enough co-q 10 naturally in their bodies.

this information was given by Dr. Jimmy who has studied these

problems for many years.

 

LAYING ON OF HANDS

laying on of hands

 

There is more than one way to do this process.  It can be done with religious prayer, or with simple words, or with formal programs, such asa REIKI HEALING or other methods similar to this.

The laying on of hands is a religious ritual that accompanies certain religious practices, which are found throughout the world in varying forms.

In Christian churches, this practice is used as both a symbolic and formal method of invoking the Holy Spirit primarily during baptisms and confirmations, healing services, blessings, and ordination of priests, ministers, elders, deacons, and other church officers, along with a variety of other church sacraments and holy ceremonies

SEE  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laying_on_of_hands


"Laying on of hands" is a biblical action; however, there is no biblical mandate requiring the physical laying on of hands for a particular spiritual ministry. Jesus certainly laid His hands on many of those He healed; however, He also healed without laying His hands on people. In fact, there were times when He was nowhere in the vicinity of those He healed. Matthew 8:8 describes Jesus healing the servant of the centurion without going near the centurion’s house.

Here are two instances to consider: in one case the Holy Spirit bestows the gift of speaking in tongues with the act of an apostle's laying on of hands, and in the other case He does so without the laying on of hands, but simply through the apostle's preaching.

"Paul said, ‘John's baptism was a baptism of repentance. He told the people to believe in the one coming after him, that is, in Jesus.’ On hearing this, they were baptized into the name of the Lord Jesus. When Paul placed his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke in tongues and prophesied" (Acts 19:4-6).

"While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit came on all who heard the message. The circumcised believers who had come with Peter were astonished that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out even on the Gentiles. For they heard them speaking in tongues and praising God" (Acts 10:44-46).

First Timothy 5:22 says, "Do not be hasty in the laying on of hands, and do not share in the sins of others. Keep yourself pure." The thought here is not so much in cautioning the physical action of laying on of hands but to urge care in bestowing the responsibility of spiritual leadership (however it it is done). It is not to be done "suddenly" or without due consideration.

Undoubtedly, the laying on of hands in the early church was a means of connecting the message with the messenger, or the spiritual gift with the gifted giver. It provided a "sign" authenticating him through whom the physical manifestation of a spiritual gift was bestowed. We need to understand very carefully that there are no magical biblical formulas for the ministry of the church. Laying on of hands has no power in itself. Laying on of hands is only

used by God when it is done in agreement with God's Word.

 

 

NOTE FROM DEE   I have studied Reiki myself twice at great expense and have two Master certificates to prove it.  Reiki is an old ancient Japanese method of healing,and the lessons are very expensive.  They say that Reiki can only be activated by a Master teacher, I personally don't agree as the healing itself comes from the God source, not from onenself.  The God source does not withhold healing because you haven't paid thousands of dollars for it. 


Reiki is very similar to the laying on of hands except that one uses specific positions on the body, nt just on the head or shoulder as in the above picture, but Reiki energy goes where it needs to go and need not be directed.  Reiki can also be done at a distance, just like prayer can be done at a distance.  The method is similar.

 

I will just give links to the best places to get training.


THIS IS STEVE MURRAY"

 

http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy-ab&hl=en&source=hp&q=reike+steve+murray+&pbx=1&oq=reike+steve+murray+&aq=f&aqi=g-l1g-lv3&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=13917l25497l0l26195l19l19l0l0l0l0l685l7464l2-4.9.3.3l19l0&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=8bdce738706c865e&biw=607&bih=236

 

REIKI HAND POSITIONS VIDEOS

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xw9EleHuXsI

 

DR. ERIC PEARL - HANDS ON HEALING

http://search.aol.com/aol/search?s_it=topsearchbox.search&v_t=comsearch50&q=DR+ERIC+PEARL

 

DR. ERIC PEARL VIDEOS

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=DR+ERIC+PEARL&aq=o

 

USUI REIKI

http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy-ab&hl=en&site=&source=hp&q=USUI+REIKI&pbx=1&oq=USUI+REIKI&aq=f&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=12401l14567l0l15078l10l10l0l2l2l0l411l1364l2-2.0.2l6l0&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=8bdce738706c865e&biw=1000&bih=692

 

 

HEALING HANDS

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&cp=10&gs_id=2l&xhr=t&q=HEALING+HANDS&qe=SEVBTElORyBIQQ&qesig=R_gi-mG3rh_Hmyd-CWZh7Q&pkc=AFgZ2tmkH5RHvNfxQaiWNEAlQRLMCFcsNsla7jS0u6dWBYtfQlaQ5Agv7HHm54QGfyYnas8K95Rutz1QD1uZz4t7gcGy25hejw&pq=usui+reiki&pf=p&sclient=psy-ab&source=hp&pbx=1&oq=HEALING+HA&aq=0&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=8bdce738706c865e&biw=1000&bih=692

 

 

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