CAPTAINS AND THE KINGS

AMAZON.COM

RADIATION FROM WAR

compiled by Dee Finney

8-24-08 - OF CAPTAINS AND THE KINGS

DREAM - I was living in an apartment building and my son Ken came to visit.

When lunchtime came, we decided to go down to the basement where they had a snack bar.

When we got down there, near the checkout was one of those turntable rack with paperback books on it.

Ken started looking at the titles of the books, and he spotted a book titled, "Of Captains and the Kings" by Taylor Caldwell.

For a paperback book, it was thick and I pulled it off the rack to look at it.  The cover was enticing - a picture of war with ships blowing up in a long ago time period.

I kind of riffled through some pages and saw the tiny print and I already knew her writing style. She writes in great detail.

By now, Ken was looking at a thinner book that was half the price, but I didn't have enough money with me to buy both books.

I asked Ken which book he wanted and he chose, "Of Captains and Kings,"  so I bought it for him.

When we got upstairs, I started thinking about Ken's reading abilities in grade school and I remembered I had had to buy him comic books to get him to to read at all when he was young.

So I had second thoughts about buying Ken the thinner book with the larger print because it would be easier to read.

So I got some cash out of the dresser drawer and told Ken I was going to go downstairs and buy him the other book also so his eyes wouldn't get so tired from reading, "Of Captains and the Kings".

So I took the money and went down the stairs to the snack bar to buy the other book.

Before I got to the door, I saw a whole set of clothing on the floor, laying all askew and it looked like the swashbuckling guy's clothes from the cover of the book, just melted from the inside out of the clothing.

As I looked at the clothing, I started to have a vision of a chain of white beads.  I don't know exactly how many there were, but as I looked at each bead, it divided into two, and I was compelled to look at each bead and watch it divide into two and then I looked at the two, and watched it divide into four.

This process kept going until the original beads had divided ten times and I was having a harder and harder time keeping track of the dividing beads.  I knew they would all divide at least ten times.

A deep male voice in my head said to me, "How do we now that radiation stops there?

NOTE:  I've read most of her books in my younger days, but I lost my fiction library from moving too many times in my life and I didn't know if I had re-purchased the book.  Strangely enough, the very next day, I was cleaning, and I looked at a stack of books right by my telephone in the living room and right there - on top of the pile was  "Of Captains and Kings" by Taylor Caldwell.  (It has a wooden war ship in the background behind pictures of the characters in the book.  The time period is 'the 1850's'.

 

Taylor Caldwell Biography and List of Works

Books by Taylor Caldwell |

Anglo-American novelist, a prolific author of popular fiction, who often uses real historical events or persons in her writing. Taylor Caldwell's best-known works include DYNASTY OF DEATH (1938), an epic story about the intrigues and alliances of two Pennsylvania families involved in the manufacture of armaments. Her last major novel, ANSWER AS A MAN, appeared in 1980, and tells a familiar story of a man who begins his rise to prestige and power in the midst of the Depression.

Janet Miriam Holland Taylor Caldwell a. k. a., Janet M. Reback (September 7, 1900August 30, 1985) was an Anglo-American novelist and prolific author of popular fiction, also known by the pen names Marcus Holland and Max Reiner, and by her married name of J. Miriam Reback.

In her fiction, she often used real historical events or persons. Taylor Caldwell's best-known works include Dynasty of Death (1938), an epic story about intrigues and alliances of two Pennsylvania families involved in the manufacture of armaments, "Dear and Glorious Physician" (about St.Luke), and "Captains and Kings". Her last major novel, Answer as a Man, appeared in 1980.

Taylor Caldwell was born in Manchester, England, into a family of Scottish background. Her family descended from the Clan of MacGregor of which the Taylors are a subsidiary clan. In 1907 she emigrated to the Unites States with her family. At the age of eight she started to write stories. In 1919 she married William F. Combs and divorced in 1931. Between the years 1918 and 1919 she served in the United States Naval Reserve. From 1923 to 1924 she was A Court Reporter in the New York State department of Labor in Buffalo, and from 1924 to 1931a member of the Board of Special Inquiry at the Department of Justice in Buffalo.

In 1931 she graduated from the University of Buffalo. In collaboration with her second husband, Marcus Reback, she wrote several bestsellers, beginning with Dynasty of Death. It depicts two families who control a huge munitions trust, and the entangled relations between the families. Caldwell had started to write the story in 1934. After its publication the book attracted wide attention when it was revealed, that behind the male pseudonym was a woman. The story is continued in THE EAGLES GATHER (1949) and THE FINAL HOUR (1944).

As a writer Caldwell was praised for her intricately plotted and suspenseful stories, which depict family tensions, and the development of the US from agrarian society into the leading industrial state of the world. Caldwell's heroes are self-made men of pronounced ethnic backgrounds, such as the German immigrants in THE STRONG CITY (1942) and THE BALANCE WHEEL (1951). Her themes are ethnic, religious and personal intolerance (THE WIDE HOUSE, 1945), the failure of parental discipline (LET LOVE COME LAST, 1949) and the conflict between the desire for power and money and the human values of love and sense of family, presented in such works as MELISSA (1948), A PROLOGUE TO LOVE (1962) and BRIGHT FLOWS THE RIVER (1978).

In her later works Caldwell explored the American Dream and wrote 'from rags to riches' stories, among them ANSWER AS A MAN (1981). Caldwell's historical novels include THE ARM AND DARKNESS, a fictitious account of Cardinal Richelieu, A PILLAR OF IRON (1965),a fictional biography of the Roman senator and orator Cicero, THE EARTH IS THE LORD'S (1941), a fictional biography of Ghengis Khan. Religious themes are prominent in several works, such as DEAR AND GLORIOUS PHYSICIAN (1959) about St. Luke, THE LISTENER (1960), and DIALOGUES WITH THE DEVIL (1967), a study of good and evil, in which Caldwell depicts a correspondence between Lucifer and Michael, mixing in the dialogue old tales, a lost continent, and theological speculations.

'"Childish raptures! said Lucifer, with scorn, his eyes flashing like lightning. "Are we indeed whimpering and craven children, or slaves? Can we be content with toys and little deliciousnesses? Are we not mind, as well as emotion? And is not the mind, of both angel and man, the noblest of possessions, and worth exercising. It is in our minds that we approach the closest of Him, Who is all Mind. Mind is the creator of all philosophy, all order, all beauty, all satisfaction, but emotion is the lowliest of the virtues, if it is a virtue at all. Mind has in it the capacity to know all things, or, at least, the minds of angels."'
(from Dialouges with the Devil)

During her career Caldwell's books have sold over thirty million copies. She received several awards, among them the National League of American Pen Woman gold medal (1948), Buffalo Evening News Award (1949), and Grand Prix Chatvain (1950).

"Jason raised his eyes and smiled. God is good. He moves mysteriously, as the priests say, but he has his ways, he has his ways!
He is not the adversary of man. Man is, Jason thought. God is not to be understood by man. He is just to be trusted."
(from Answer as a Man)

Caldwell was married four times. She was an outspoken conservative and for a time associated with the anti-Semitic Liberty Lobby. Her memoir, GROWING UP TOUGH, appeared in 1971. Caldwell continued writing until 1980, when a stroke left her deaf and unable to speak. She died in Greenwich, Connecticut on September 2, 1985.

For further reading: In Search of Taylor Caldwell by J. Stearn (1974); Twentieth-Century Romance & Historical Writers, ed. by Lesley Henderson (1990); World Authors 1900-1950, ed. by Martin S. Aeymour-Smith and Andrew C. Kimmens (1996, vol. 1).

  

other covers - different from my copy printed in 1993 which was the 43rd edition

DVD Cover

In The Captains and the Kings (1976) Caldwell takes on the global power brokers. In this book we find, running through the story line, a description of the way the international financiers and industrialists (all private consortiums owned by an elite of the world's richest families and persons) hijack governments around the globe; instigating wars and gaining control over the warring countries through manipulation of the enormous debts incurred during a war. Mentioned too is the Council on Foreign Relations; and while a disclaimer states that all persons portrayed in the book are fictional, it is clear that the Council on Foreign Relations, as well as another major organization of the globalists are both very real organizations. Also described is the idea that political systems everywhere, and certainly in the US, are almost totally dominated by the ruling elite; and that no one even gets into the running for a major political office unless the elite believes the person is under their control. It is explained that this can be direct control; e.g., the candidate takes a solemn oath to be true to that organization above all others; or indirect control: the candidate is known to have done something illegal or scandalous. The threat of public exposure can then be used to bend the person to the will of the elite. Politicians can also be compromised through a "set-up".

When necessary the elite will play that hand (conform or be ruined by the controlled media). It is further explained that there have been a few who were not under the control of the elite (back in the 40s and 50s) and who had some success on their own. These individuals were not corruptible and in such cases very dirty tricks were employed against them. There is a figure in the book obviously symbolising JFK, who went along with the elitists (his father's cronies), but who once in power went his own way - resulting in his assassination.

The Captains and the Kings was made into a TV mini-series that avoided all the serious implications of the book and concentrated on being a predictable sex-and-drama story.

EDITORS NOTE:  Because of the article above, I was compelled to look up the political groups mentioned. They didn't exist in the time period of the book, but they existed during the time of the writing of the book.  For example: 

The Council of Foreign Relations came into existence in 1921.
 

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an American nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (at Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Many believe it to be the most powerful private organization to influence United States foreign policy. It publishes the bi-monthly journal Foreign Affairs. It has an extensive website, featuring links to its think tank, The David Rockefeller Studies Program, other programs and projects, publications, history, biographies of notable directors and other board members, corporate members, and press releases.
The Council's mission is promoting understanding of foreign policy and the United States' role in the world. Meetings are convened at which government officials, global leaders and prominent members debate major foreign-policy issues. It has a think tank that employs prominent scholars in international affairs and it commissions subsequent books and reports. A central aim of the Council, it states, is to "find and nurture the next generation of foreign policy leaders." It established "Independent Task Forces" in 1995, which encourage policy debate. Comprising experts with diverse backgrounds and expertise, these task forces seek consensus in making policy recommendations on critical issues; to date, the Council has convened more than fifty times.[2]

The internal think tank is The David Rockefeller Studies Program, which grants fellowships and whose programs are described as being integral to the goal of contributing to the ongoing debate on foreign policy; fellows in this program research and write on the most important challenges facing the United States and the world.

At the outset of the organization, founding member Elihu Root said the group's mission, epitomized in its journal Foreign Affairs, should be to "guide" American public opinion. In the early 1970s, the CFR changed the mission, saying that it wished instead to "inform" public opinion.
 

The earliest origin of the Council stemmed from a working fellowship of about 150 scholars, called "The Inquiry," tasked to brief President Woodrow Wilson about options for the postwar world when Germany was defeated. Through 19171918, this academic band, including Wilson's closest adviser and long-time friend Col. Edward M. House, as well as Walter Lippmann, gathered at 155th Street and Broadway in New York City, to assemble the strategy for the postwar world. The team produced more than 2,000 documents detailing and analyzing the political, economic, and social facts globally that would be helpful for Wilson in the peace talks. Their reports formed the basis for the Fourteen Points, which outlined Wilson's strategy for peace after war's end.

These scholars then traveled to the Paris Peace Conference, 1919 that would end the war; it was at one of the meetings of a small group of British and American diplomats and scholars, on May 30, 1919, at the Hotel Majestic, that both the Council and its British counterpart, the Chatham House in London, were born. Although the original intent was for the two organizations to be affiliated, they became independent bodies, yet retained close informal ties.

Some of the participants at that meeting, apart from Edward House, were Paul Warburg, Herbert Hoover, Harold Temperley, Lionel Curtis, Lord Eustace Percy, Christian Herter, and American academic historians James Thomson Shotwell of Columbia University, Archibald Cary Coolidge of Harvard, and Charles Seymour of Yale.

The modern Illuminati came into existence in: 1776

Illuminati (plural of Latin illuminatus, "enlightened") is a name that refers to several groups, both historical and modern, and both real and fictitious. Historically, it refers specifically to the (Bavarian) Illuminati, an Enlightenment-era secret society founded on May 1st, 1776, which was dedicated to the systematic and stealthy conquest of nations, one by one, and ultimately the entire world.[1]In modern times it is also used to refer to a purported conspiratorial organization which acts as a shadowy power behind the throne, allegedly controlling world affairs through present day governments and corporations, usually as a modern incarnation or continuation of the Bavarian Illuminati. In this context, Illuminati is often used in reference to a New World Order (NWO). Many conspiracy theorists believe the Illuminati are the masterminds behind events that will lead to the establishment of such a New World Order.
 

In more rare cases, the Illuminati might refer to a gnostic elite who do not cooperate completely with the Bavarian Illuminati's agenda of world domination, but like those who do, they focus upon the belief that they are uniquely empowered by their pseudo-Buddhist-like enlightenment, similar to the intelligentsia classes of today are empowered by their education and intelligence. These are people who consider themselves to have become illuminated and have achieved a far greater mystical understanding of the universe than the vast majority of the ignorant masses of the world. Many secret societies and mystical traditions are concerned with the attainment of this kind of illumination or enlightenment via occult practices, and with keeping its secrets to themselves and their initiates, such as the Rosicrucian Societies and Martinist Societies.

The Bilderbergs came into existence in 1954:
 

The Bilderberg Group, Bilderberg conference, or Bilderberg Club is an unofficial annual invitation-only conference of around 130 guests, most of whom are persons of influence in the fields of business, media and politics.

The elite group meets annually at luxury hotels or resorts throughout the world normally in Europe and once every four years in the United States or Canada. It has an office in Leiden in the Netherlands. The 2007 conference took place from May 31 to June 3 at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Istanbul, Turkey.  The 2008 conference took place in Chantilly, Virginia, United States
 

The original Bilderberg conference was held at the Hotel de Bilderberg, near Arnhem in The Netherlands, from May 29 to May 31, 1954. The meeting was initiated by several people, including Joseph Retinger, concerned about the growth of anti-Americanism in Western Europe, who proposed an international conference at which leaders from European countries and the United States would be brought together with the aim of promoting understanding between the cultures of United States of America and Western Europe.

Retinger approached Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, who agreed to promote the idea, together with Belgian Prime Minister Paul Van Zeeland, and the head of Unilever at that time, the Dutchman Paul Rijkens. Bernhard in turn contacted Walter Bedell Smith, then head of the CIA, who asked Eisenhower adviser C. D. Jackson to deal with the suggestion. The guest list was to be drawn up by inviting two attendees from each nation, one each to represent conservative and liberal (both terms used in the American sense) points of view.

The success of the meeting led the organizers to arrange an annual conference. A permanent Steering Committee was established, with Retinger appointed as permanent secretary. As well as organizing the conference, the steering committee also maintained a register of attendee names and contact details, with the aim of creating an informal network of individuals who could call upon one another in a private capacity. Conferences were held in France, Germany, and Denmark over the following three years. In 1957, the first U.S. conference was held in St. Simons, Georgia, with $30,000 from the Ford Foundation. The foundation supplied additional funding of $48,000 in 1959, and $60,000 in 1963.

Dutch economist Ernst van der Beugel took over as permanent secretary in 1960, upon the death of Retinger. Prince Bernhard continued to serve as the meeting's chairman until 1976, the year of his involvement in the Lockheed affair. There was no conference that year, but meetings resumed in 1977 under Alec Douglas-Home, the former British Prime Minister. He was followed in turn by Walter Scheel, ex-President of West Germany, Eric Roll, former head of SG Warburg and Lord Carrington, former Secretary-General of NATO.

NOTE: John F. Kennedy was assassinated on my husband's birthday - November 22, 1963.  I sat on the floor in the living room watching this happening on television, tears running down my face, with my three oldest sons who were all babies at the time sitting on my lap while the birthday cake was baking in the oven.  It was terrible day for everyone.  I was never satisfied that Oswald killed him all by himself, and I've collected dozens of books written by researchers to prove that fact.

See;  http://www.greatdreams.com/consp.htm

 

BRIEF STUDY GUIDE
FROM: http://www.bookrags.com/shortguide-captains-and-the-kings/

The overwhelming theory advanced in this novel is that the world is run by an international, apolitical cabal of bankers. According to the author's voice, the American Civil War was planned in London in 1857 in order to raise vast sums of money. This cabal of the "Elite" has no nationalistic prejudices, for they are loyal only to each other and to their banking interests.

NOTE:   1861/1865  Civil War

Union Participants 2,213,000 - Union Deaths in Service - 364,000

Confederate Participants* 1,000,000 -  Confederate Deaths in Service* 133,821

When Abraham Lincoln talked forgiveness for the South and threatened the extravagant hopes for plunder and profit from the vanquished land, he was eliminated. When Garfield showed sympathy for the plight of immigrant  worker, he was eliminated. McKinley did not want a Spanish-American War (although his vice president did), and he too was eliminated. When Rory Armagh, groomed for the presidential nomination in 1912, decides to blow the whistle.....

NOTE: 

  1. THE DEATH OF THE PRESIDENT

    The assassinated presidents were Lincoln, Garfield, and McKinley ....
    On July 21, 1881
    Garfield was boarding a train in Washington DC when he was shot ...
    www.greatdreams.com/prsdeth.htm
Characters

Joseph Francis X. Armagh was thirteen years old when his mother died on the ship bearing them to America from the Potato Famine. At home the Catholic Irish were harassed by the hated Sassenagh, but in the strange new land, they were stripped of all dignity. Joe vows to assume financial responsibility for his brother and infant sister, entrusts them to a Catholic orphanage and painfully makes his way into a barbarically inhospitable and prejudiced pre-Civil War America. He is relentless in his climb upwards; self-pity is as repugnant to him as sentimentality, and compassion is an insult.

On his way to Titusville for the oil boom he is adopted by a newly wealthy Irishman who is impressed by the principled youth and eventually makes him his heir. He wisely diversifies his funds and soon.....

Techniques

Despite an absence of literary style (Caldwell is a storyteller, not a stylist), the raw emotions of this work grip the reader and the characterization, although not consummate in a literary sense, is satisfying to a general audience. Although there is a certain looseness of construction and carelessness about details (e.g., the use of the term muckraker before its entrance into the language, the Molly Maguires described as railroad workers instead of coal miners), immediacy is achieved by references to issues of the times and occasionally by the use of direct quotations.....

Themes

One theme is the greed of those who have, as opposed to the ignorance and credulity of those who have not. The story is of Joseph Armagh's revenge on a world that forced him to deny his own identity as an Irishman and as a "Roman" (Catholic). By Joe's own characterization, mankind is the most selfish species ever "spewed out of hell," and the novel is consistent with this vision. Joe's ruthless climb to the top is a joyless quest devoid of humor, satisfaction, or empathy.

Because the inevitable assassination of his son Rory Armagh is accompanied by references to the apocalyptic vision of St. John the Divine who foretold the enslavement of the world, there is as well a lesson in the implacability of Biblical prophecy.

Adaptations

In 1976, a television miniseries of Captains and the Kings was made. Directed by Douglas Heyes and Allen Reisner, it starred Richard Jordan, Ray Bolger, Patty Duke Astin, Joanna Pettet, and Barbara Parkins. It was one of the first such miniseries, and, because another syndicate hastened to purchase Testimony of Two Men, Caldwell was the only author with the distinction of having two such miniseries going at the same time. 
 

Related Titles

The long dynastic saga was not a new undertaking for Caldwell. Her very first novel Dynasty of Death (1938) about the Bouchard clan who controls a huge munitions trust, became a three book trilogy.

Writing

As a writer Caldwell was praised for her intricately plotted and suspenseful stories, which depicted family tensions and the development of the U.S. from an agrarian society into the leading industrial state of the world. Caldwell's heroes are self-made men of pronounced ethnic background, such as the German immigrants in The Strong City (1942) and The Balance Wheel (1951). Her themes are ethnic, religious and personal intolerance (The Wide House, 1945), the failure of parental discipline (Let Love Come Last, 1949) and the conflict between the desire for power and money and the human values of love and sense of family, presented in such works as Melissa (1948), A Prologue to Love (1962) and Bright Flows the River (1978).
Later works

In her later works Caldwell explored the American Dream and wrote stories "from rag to riches" course of life, among them Answer as a Man (1981). Caldwell's historical novels include The Arm and the Darkness, a fictionalized account of Cardinal Richelieu; A Pillar of Iron (1965), a fictional biography of Cicero, the Roman senator and orator; and The Earth Is the Lord's (1941), a fictional biography of Genghis Khan. Religious themes were prominent in several works. Answer as a Man begins with the clamour of the bells of a little church and ends with renewed faith.

"Jason raised his eyes and smiled. God is good. He moves mysteriously, as the priests say, but he has his ways, he has his ways! He is not the adversory of man. Man is, Jason thought. God is not to be understood by man. He is just to be trusted." (from Answer as a Man).

In the story Jason Garrity pins his hopes on the building of a luxury hotel, but Caldwell deals also with politics and history ("Hell! thought Jason. What can I, as a single individual, do to prevent calamity? Nothing. Taft is the safest man. He is not an imperialist, like Roosevelt. Nor a social fanatic like Wilson. I'll vote for Taft."). Dear and Glorious Physician (1959) was about Luke the Evangelist, and Dialogues with the Devil (1967) was a study of good and evil. Caldwell depicts in it a correspondence between Lucifer and Michael, mixing in the dialogue old tales, a lost continent, and theological speculations.

'"Childish raptures! said Lucifer, with scorn, his eyes flashing like lightning. "Are we indeed whimpering and craven children, or slaves? Can we be content with toys and little deliciousnesses? Are we not mind, as well as emotion? And is not the mind, of both angel and man, the noblest of possessions, and worth exercising. It is in our minds that we approach the closest of Him, Who is all Mind. Mind is the creator of all philosophy, all order, all beauty, all satisfaction, but emotion is the lowliest of the virtues, if it is a virtue at all. Mind has in it the capacity to know all things, or, at least, the minds of angels."' (from Dialogues with the Devil)

Writing career

During her career as a writer Caldwell's books sold over thirty million copies. She received several awards, among them the National League of American Pen Women gold medal (1948), Buffalo Evening News Award (1949), and Grand Prix Chatvain (1950). Caldwell was married four times altogether the third time to William Everett Stancell, and the fourth and final time to William Robert Prestie, who was a follower of Subud (he died in 2002). She had two daughters, Judith and Mary (Judith died in 1979). She was an outspoken conservative and for a time wrote for the John Birch Society's monthly journal American Opinion and even associated with the anti-Semitic Liberty Lobby. Her memoir, On Growing Up Tough, appeared in 1971, consisting of many edited-down articles from American Opinion. Caldwell continued writing until 1980, when a stroke left her deaf and unable to speak. She died of pulmonary failure in Greenwich, Connecticut on September 2, 1985.

 

  1. 19 GREAT WOMEN WRITERS

    Taylor Caldwell - *

    novelist Willa Cather (My Antonia, O, Pioneers! or any of her novels and short stories) See also Cora's Eng 104 Author Links (1): Cather ...
    www.greatdreams.com/great_women_writers.htm

 

 

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DREAMS OF THE GREAT EARTHCHANGES - MAIN INDEX