Dee Finney's blog  June 9, 2012  page 237  RAINWATER CONTROL

 

 

 

 

 

Dee Finney's blog
start date  July 20, 2011
Today's date  June 9, 2012
page 237

TOPIC:  RAINWATER CONTROL

9-12 - MEDITATION DREAM -   Since I didn't dream anything worthwhile last night, I got up at 2 a.m., wrote a couple e-mails and posted a note on my facebook page, then ate breakfast, watched TV about the execution of Eileen Warnos in Florida.  She really was nuts and blamed the cops for her killing seven men in one year, claiming that the cops didn't catch her on purpose, because they wanted to make money off of making movies about her being  a serial killer.

I'm sure lots of people have made money off of that since then.

Anyway, I decided to meditate or at least dream and get something new to write about. 


Here it is:

 

I started wondering  whether any of my sons had basements in their houses since I've never been to any of them.

I pictured rainwater coming through the bricks or concrete basement walls and running across the floor and down the drain.
 

I immediately fell into a dream in which I was working in an office as a purchasing buyer, writing to contractors for quotes for machinery about rainwater control.


An engineer came into the office and asked to see what I was working on.  I showed him my paperwork and he started to laugh, saying that would never work.


I questioned him about that, since we women in the office never got to go out into the shop to see things being constructed, nor into the field to see what worked.


He said, "Are you local?


I didn't know what he meant by that, and asked him that.


All of a sudden, my baby boy was in the office with me, which I didn't notice before.  I picked him up and held him close, and the baby started to talk to me.   He aid,  "Say, "Love", so I said, "Love!"  He said, "Be gentle and call me Liam!"  so I said, "Liam!"


Liam is short for William, and my youngest son is named William.  I never considered calling him Liam.  We call him, Bill!

 

Anyway, I woke up with my baby boy's face in my vision, knowing that I needed to do some research on rainwater control.   I know that some states have laws against saving rainwater in barrels to drink out of.  They want all the rainwater to go back into the ground.

 

NOTE:  for this page, I will focus on normal rainfall, not major storms or tornadoes - this is only for household control.

REGULATIONS & STATUTES

Recent Updates:

Rainwater Harvesting is exploding and so are the cities, states and other entities involvement with it. Below is a state by state listing of past and current efforts dealing with rainwater and greywater.

This list is changing monthly. If you find something that needs to be added to this listing, please email it to me and I will add it and add a mention of it on the front page. email Doug

The American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association (ARCSA) and the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) have agreed upon a standard for inclusion in a new sustainable plumbing standard planned for 2009. This ARCSA standards guide is also available to cities and planning agencies as a standard for local adoption. This document contains specifications for each system component and example diagrams. It is also an excellent guide for those intererested in designing and installing rainwater catchment systems. ARCSA/ASPE Guidelines

Still there is much confusion about what harvested rainwater really is. Some US jurisdictions consider it reclaimed water and others refer to it as “graywater.” Actually it is neither. Definitions from the Universal Plumbing Code (UPC) are below.

According to Bob Boulware, P.E., President of Design-Aire Engineering, Inc, Board member and Chair of the committee for ARCSA that is driving these guidelines, the United Nations and countries around the globe are concerned that in the next 10 to 15 years, competition from the increase in the world’s population, along with increased pollution of existing water supplies, will put such a demand on the world’s available fresh water that instability of world governments may occur. This also means that a child starting school today, by the time he graduates from high school, will have trouble finding a clean glass of drinking water. By promoting and developing design and installation guidelines with others in the water industry now, we aim to provide at least a partial solution to this impending crisis. The knowledge and skill of how to find and manage clean water will be vital information for future generations to know in order to sustain the lifestyle we have today.

With the growth of rainwater harvesting there is a definite need for leadership and direction. Conflicting code and certifications will only hamper growth and adoption. The good news, as is visible below in the state-by-state listing; states, counties and cities are getting involved. The bad news lots of uncoordinated activities and directions. Hopefully ARCSA will bring some order to this area and thereby hasten growth in the industry.

Black Water is toilet waste.

Graywater is untreated waste water that has not come in contact with toilet waste. Graywater includes used water from bathtubs, showers, lavatories and water from clothes washing machines. It does not include waste water from kitchen sinks or dishwashers.

Reclaimed Water is water which, as a result of tertiary treatment of domestic waste water by a public agency, is suitable for a controlled use. The controlled use can be the supply of reclaimed water to water closets, urinals and trap seal primers for floor drains and floor sinks. In areas under the jurisdiction of the UPC this system is usually called a “purple pipe” system because the reclaimed water is conveyed in pipe that is purple in color.

Harvested Rainwater is storm water that is conveyed from a building roof, stored in a cistern and disinfected and filtered before being used for toilet flushing. It can also be used for landscape irrigation.

Appendix J of the UPC deals with reclaimed water, but according to the above definition, rainwater harvesting is not reclaimed water. Plumbing officials that do not know how to classify rainwater harvesting systems consider it reclaimed water systems and therefore require plumbing engineers to design systems that conform to Appendix J of the UPC. This is due to the lack of guidance in the code. As rainwater catchment systems are becoming more prevalent in the United States, both the UPC and the IPC need a section dedicated to rainwater harvesting.

Below is a list of currently known regulations. If you find updated or new regulations, please send them to Doug at HarvestH2o.com so others will benefit from your findings.

International Guidelines Other Informational Links

American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association (ARCSA) / ASPE Guidelines

EPA Municipal Handbook Rainwater Harvesting Policies

Recent article on the State of Regulations in the US

Currently there is no US agency that has focus on Rainwater Harvesting and states are rapidly doing there own thing. Below is a list of the actions by individual states. Over time the federal government will get more and more involved as water conflicts and shortages continue to occur. One bill that moves in this direction is HR3598 that mandates consideration of water intensity in the Department of Energy's energy research, development, and demonstration programs to help guarantee efficient, reliable, and sustainable delivery of energy and water resources.

Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming

| US Virgin Islands International Related Links

Alabama - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Alaska - Vendor Directory - Incentives

The Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) provides research for the development and advancement of healthy, durable and economically sound shelters for Alaskans. CCHRC provide research and publishes information on sustainable building practices in Alaska.

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Arizona - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Senate Bill 1522 seeks a major change in Arizona water law, creating a new fourth type of water called harvested rainwater. SB 1522 involves what it calls macro-rainwater harvesting, which rather than collecting water from the roofs of homes would involve large projects to collect rainfall.

The City of Tucson, Arizona, has instituted requirements for water harvesting in its land use code as a means of providing supplemental water for on-site irrigation.

 

Per the city's website, water harvesting is the practice of capturing and collecting runoff from storms and using the "harvested" stormwater to provide supplemental water for landscape plants. Water harvesting has numerous benefits. Water harvesting reduces the amount of stormwater flowing in streets or onto adjacent properties, increases the quantity and quality of the water supply for landscape plants, and helps keep potential stormwater pollutants out of our streets, watercourses and ultimately, the groundwater. Water harvesting appropriately designed and monitored, can reduce the amount of potable water used for irrigation, saving a development money and reducing the demand on the City's potable water delivery system.

The Water Harvesting Guidance Manual was developed in accordance with Mayor and Council direction. On October 18, 2005, the Mayor and Council (M&C) passed an Ordinance supporting the Water Harvesting Guidance Manual for use by developers in planning a strategy to implement water harvesting for new developments, including City projects.

The City of Tucson is considering mandating greywater stubouts in all new home construction, and mandating that all properties supply a percent of water for landscape watering through rainwater.

Statutes: No state statutes or regulations.

Taxes: Credit for plumbing stubouts and water conservation in place through tax year 2011. Maximum resident credit $1,200. Also credits for businesses covered in tax statue. The tax credit used to only give the credit to greywater systems, but now that Technical correction (HB 2103) was passed and becomes law effective September 26, 2008, the tax credit will also apply to rainwater harvesting systems. Once it takes effect, it will be retroactive to January 1, 2007.

Information Links:

Arkansas - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

California - Vendor Directory - Incentives

The California Rainwater Capture Act of 2011, which would authorize a landowner to install, maintain, and operate, on the landowner's property, a rainwater capture system meeting specified requirements. This bill would additionally authorize a landscape contractor working within the classification of his or her license to enter into a prime contract for the construction of a rainwater capture system, as defined, if the system is used exclusively for landscape irrigation. The bill would authorize a landscape contractor holding a specified classification to design and install all exterior components of a rainwater capture system that are not a part of, or attached to, a structure. The bill is also known as AB 275

Los Angeles City Council Unanimously Passes Low Impact Development Ordinance - The Los Angeles City Council has unanimously passed a landmark Low Impact Development Ordinance (LID). Developed by the Bureau of Sanitation in collaboration with community members, environmental organizations, business groups and the building industry, LID calls for development and redevelopment projects to mitigate runoff in a manner that captures rainwater at its source, while utilizing natural resources including rain barrels, permeable pavement, rainwater storage tanks, infiltration swales or curb bumpouts to contain water. Reports have shown that LID is the most effective and cost-efficient means of managing stormwater and abating water pollution. LID practices are designed to address runoff and pollution at the source. Other low impact development benefits include water conservation, groundwater recharge and greening communities.

Two bills in 2009 session were passed supporting Rainwater Harvesting.

AB 300 - This bill ensures that homebuilders, who employ voluntary water demand measures, receive reasonable credit for their savings in connection with water-demand assessments and verifications done during the entitlement process. In doing so, AB 300 promotes adoption of water conservation approaches that will reduce California’s water consumption at no cost to the state. >> more

AB 1408 - This bill ensures that water conservation measures continue when the property is sold. Water suppliers must be able to count on water savings long-term. Modeled on a 700-home development in Contra Costa County, the bill also aims to have total water used after new development be equal to or less than total water used before the project. >> more

In 2007 two bills passed and were signed that compel local water districts to create water conservation programs.

AB 1420 - Beginning January 1, 2009, the terms of, and eligibility for, a water management grant or loan made to an urban water supplier and awarded or administered by the department, state board, or California Bay-Delta Authority or its successor agency shall be conditioned on the implementation of the water demand management measures...

AB 1560 - This bill would authorize the department to propose standards related to voluntary best practice and mandatory requirements related to environmentally preferable water using devices and measures...

Neither bill mentions Rainwater Harvesting. Please get involved and make your legislator, water conservation district, and water utility company aware it should be included in any adopted water conservation program.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Colorado - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: Times are a changing.

Historically, Colorado's 120 year old water law doesn't specifically talk about buckets or cisterns, but the principle of prior appropriation applies. That means water, including whatever falls from the sky and off your roof, must be allowed to flow downstream to those who have a legal right to use it. "When it's in the sky it's fine. But as soon it hits the ground, or on the way to the ground, that's where it kind of changes a little," said Doug Kemper, executive director of the Colorado Water Congress.

However, Colorado is taking baby steps towards legalizing rainwater collection. Senate Bill 80 was signed by the Governor on 4/22/09 and becomes law on July 1, 2009. It allows rural catchment (Senate Bill 80), but still has some hurdles for those that want to move forward. (See bill below).

Another bill allowing 10 developments to harvest rainwater (House Bill 1129) is currently in front of the 2009 legislature.

Taxes: No state tax incentives.

Information Links:

Connecticut - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Delaware - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Florida - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Florida is getting hot. Florida Keys is offering a rebate and there are several bills that could dramatically impact rainwater harvesting in FL.

Additionally, Tampa Bay Water has been working with the University of South Florida (Engineering), the University of Florida Environmental Law Institute, and the Florida Irrigation Society (mostly irrigation needs assessment) to develop a Standardized (or turn-key) Rainwater Harvesting Presentation designed to be used by the statewide Florida Yards and Neighborhoods (FYN) Program, local and regional governments.

The intent is to resolve outstanding issues precluding local officials from presenting long-term quantifiable changes in the use of potable water for irrigation purposes through the use of cisterns. In addition, the workshop development structure will provide both directions on how to; give workshops, how to link with parties interested in sponsoring them (like the Florida Irrigation Society, ARCSA, and there has been some interest from the Plumbing, Heating and Cooling Contractors- PHCC), background technical information and where to get more information, reviews of applicable codes and standards nationwide, any conflict of interest issues associated with public officials promoting the materials, and potential liability issues raised by local governments and the FYN program.

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Georgia - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws. Atlanta passed potable rainwater ordinance for single family homes.

Taxes: Georgia House Bill 1069 provides a $2,500 tax credit for approved energy and water efficiency projects. It is thought that rainwater harvesting systems may qualify for this tax credit.

Information Links:

Hawaii - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Rainwater harvesting is a growth business in Hawaii due to population growth and the lack of infrastructure. Many outlining areas do not have buried water lines and consequently, no access to city water. Drilling a well is prohibitively expensive. Hauling water or rainwater harvesting are the only options to many rural areas.

Statutes: Passed in March 2008, a resolution requesting each county study the feasibility of launching a water conservation program that includes rainwater harvesting for non-potable water use.

Taxes: No tax incentives.

Information Links:

Idaho - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: Legal to capture rainwater off roof structures and the ground as long as the rain has not entered a natural waterway.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Illinois - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: SB2549 amends the Illinois Plumbing License Law. Provides that, if a unit of local government regulates rainwater harvesting systems, then those reclaimed water systems must meet specific requirements. The Department
shall promulgate and publish a minimum code of standards for rainwater harvesting collection systems and rainwater harvesting distribution systems by January 1, 2010.

SB2549 called Rainwater Harvesting for Non-Potable Uses, is co-sponsored by state Sen. Susan Garrett (D-Highwood) and state Rep. Kevin McCarthy (D-Orland Park) and if passed would require the Illinois Department of Public Health to develop standards for rainwater capture, ensuring that rainwater could not enter the public water supply. (Current Status – Passed Senate; - House – Rules Committee)

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Indiana - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Iowa - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

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Kansas - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Kentucky - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Louisiana - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Maine - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

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Maryland - Vendor Directory - Incentives


Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

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Massachusetts - Vendor Directory - Incentives


Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Michigan - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Minnesota - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: Minnesota does not conform to UPC or IPC rules so plumbing code changes are slow to happen. Adoption of Chapter 5 of IAPMO was denied by the plumbing board in the summer of 2011.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

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Mississippi - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Missouri - Vendor Directory - Incentives


Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Montana - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Nebraska - Vendor Directory - Incentives


Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Nevada - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

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New Hampshire - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

New Jersey - Vendor Directory - Incentives


Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

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New Mexico - Vendor Directory - Incentives

In New Mexico all water rights are appropriated by priority - first in time, first in line.

In 1907, a Territorial Water Code was created which enables water rights to be severed from the land. The State Engineer's duty is to administer water rights throughout the state.

New Mexico has no laws or statutes dealing with the legal ownership of rainwater.

Because the state relies on prior appropriate, all water rights are already accounted for; consequently, all developers must acquire existing rights before they can proceed. This is leading to developers and builders to integrate water conservation into all new developments and in some cases the incorporation of rainwater harvesting systems for outside watering purposes. These features directly reduce the amount of water that must be acquired for a development.

Santa Fe county has enacted restrictions on developers requiring legal acquisition of water rights, prior to approving new developments.

Statutes: There are no state government requirements for outdoor use of rainwater (3/08). However, indoor rainwater use must meet the standards for reclaimed water and will require a variance if used residentially.

Regulations apply to gray water systems and it is regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). Rainwater does not fall under the definition of gray water in the state of New Mexico. According to the NMED website a NMED permit is not required on gray water system on systems less than 250 gallons per day for private residential systems as long as done in accordance with requirements outlined in the NMED Gray Water Irrigation Guide.

Taxes: Tax credit for NEW Green Buildings, which could include rainwater harvesting. For Build Green New Mexico “Gold level”, the maximum possible credit is $11,000.00 per house. For LEED for Homes, the maximum possible tax credit is $22,450.00 per house.

Information Links:

New York - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

North Carolina - Vendor Directory - Incentives

NC Adopts Code Council IgCC Rainwater Harvest Provisions. Understanding the need for greater water conservation, the North Carolina Building Code Council recently voted to adopt an appendix to the North Carolina Plumbing Code to include an amended version of the Rainwater Collection and Distribution Systems (Section 707) of the International Green Construction Code Public Version 1.0 (IgCC), developed by the International Code Council and its cooperating sponsors. The IgCC’s comprehensive section on rainwater harvest will dramatically enhance the North Carolina Plumbing Code (the International Plumbing Code with North Carolina amendments) already in use throughout the state.

The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Soil and Water has implement Community Conservation Assistance Program. The conservation district has created a voluntary, incentive-based program designed to improve water quality through the installation of various best management practices (BMPs) on urban, suburban and rural lands, not directly involved in agricultural production. CCAP consists of educational, technical and financial assistance provided to landowners by local soil and water conservation districts.

Under this program the landowner may be reimbursed up to 75 percent of the pre-established average cost of the BMP. Included in this program are Rainwater Harvesting Systems.

Statutes: NC 1385, currently under consideration, provides a tax credit for installation of a cistern, and prohibits that cities can not prohibit rainwater recovery systems.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

North Dakota - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Ohio - Vendor Directory - Incentives

The State of Ohio has the most extensive rules on rainwater harvesting in the United States, with code on cistern size and material, manhole openings, outlet drains, overflow pipes, fittings, couplings, and even roof washers. Ohio’s rules also address disinfection of private water systems (Ohio, 2004).

Cisterns and stored water storage tanks must have a smooth interior surface and concrete tanks must be constructed in accordance with ASTM C913, Standard Specification for Precast Concrete Water and Wastewater Structures. Plastic and fiberglass tank materials and all joints, connections, and sealant must meet NSF/ANSI Standard 61, Drinking Water System Components.

Statutes: Regulated by the Ohio Department of Health under Sections 3701.344 to 3701.347 of the Ohio Revised Code and Chapter 3701-28 of the Ohio Administrative Code. Private Water Systems are potable water wells, ponds, springs, cisterns and hauled water storage tanks that provide drinking water to fewer than 25 people, less than sixty days out of the year, and have less than 15 service connections. These would include single water supplies that serve homes, small businesses, small churches, small mobile home parks or communities with fewer than 25 residents.

You will also need to get a permit from the local health department.

Taxes: No state tax incentives.

Information Links:

Oklahoma - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Oregon - Vendor Directory - Incentives

In Oregon, only roof surfaces may be used for harvesting rainwater.

The City of Portland, Oregon, requires a minimum cistern capacity of 1,500 gallons capable of being filled with harvested rainwater or municipal water, with a reduced pressure backflow device and an air gap protecting the municipal supply from cross-connection.

Statutes: Oregon's New 'Reach Code' Utilizes IAPMO's Green Plumbing and Mechanical Code Supplement. The "Reach Code," established in Senate Bill 79 (2009), requires the State of Oregon Building Codes Division to adopt a code encompassing construction methods and technology designed to increase energy and water efficiency over the mandatory codes for builders that choose to incorporate them. Chapter 7 of the code, "Water Resource Conservation and Efficiency," is based upon the 2010 IAPMO Green Plumbing and Mechanical Code Supplement, a tool designed to be used as an overlay to any building code to provide code officials with comprehensive, progressive and enforceable green provisions toward sustainable construction practices.

Taxes: No state tax incentives in place.

Information Links:

Pennsylvania - Vendor Directory - Incentives


Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

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Rhode Island - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

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South Carolina - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

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Tennessee - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Texas - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Rainwater harvesting is growing quickly around the entire state. Texas has a very active rainwater organization that is vigorously promoting the technology and working with the legislature to ensure it is both protected and promoted.

Additionally, Texas Water Development Board sponsors the Texas Rain Catcher Award, to promote the technology, educate the public, and to recognize excellence in the application of rainwater harvesting systems in Texas.

Statutes: A number of bills are in front of the 2011 legislature.

HB 3391 is a general rainwater bill that allows sole use of rainwater for developments and insures rainwater is viewed as a viable source of water.

HB 3327 allows indoor potable use of rainwater for public dwellings connected to a public water supply. It's companion bill in the Senate is SB 1073.

HB 645, passed by the 78th Legislature in 2003, prevents homeowners associations from banning outdoor water-conserving measures such as composting, water-efficient landscapes, drip irrigation, and rainwater harvesting installations. The legislation allows homeowners associations to require screening or shielding to obscure view of the tanks.

Taxes: No state income tax, so no state credit available; although, some counties do offer rebates and home owner tax credits. Additionally, there is a state sales tax exemption on the purchasing of rainwater harvesting equipment.

Information Links:

Utah - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: Water is owned by the state. However the state passed Senate Bill 32 in 2010 which permits rainwater catchment for maximum capacity of no more than 2,500 gallons. There are several other restrictions, but the state engineer must grant the permit if all the conditions are met.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Senate Bill 32

Prior to SB 32 - Catching rain water is against the law

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Vermont - Vendor Directory - Incentives


In Vermont, there is no known rainwater law; however, starting Sept. 1, 2009 commercial enterprises that withdraw 20,0000 gallons a day or more to file a report with the state , and to obtain a permit for withdrawal of more than 57,000 gallons effective July 2010. Most farming operations will be exempt.

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No known links

Virginia - Vendor Directory - Incentives

A comprehensive guide to examining, designing and maintaining rainwater harvesting systems to abate stormwater runoff has been published for Virginia by the Carell Brand Center in 2007.

The Virginia Stormwater Management Act states that localities covered under the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act within the Tidewater area are required to adopt a local stormwater management program, while any localities located outside this area may voluntarily adopt a local stormwater management program.

Rainwater harvesting is promoted as one solution to this problem in the Virginia Rainwater Harvesting Manual 2007. In 2001, Virginia passed a Senate bill 1416 which gave income tax credit to individuals and corporations that installed rainwater systems. It was not funded, and active efforts are underway to put in place future tax credits.

Statutes: No statutes or laws regulating rainwater currently known to be in place.

Taxes: No current state tax inc

Information Links:

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Washington - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: Passed the law RCW 36.89.080 that mandates the reduction in stormwater rates of at least 10% for installation of rainwater harvesting systems.

The rate a county may charge under this section for storm water control facilities shall be reduced by a minimum of ten percent for any new or remodeled commercial building that utilizes a permissive rainwater harvesting system. Rainwater harvesting systems shall be properly sized to utilize the available roof surface of the building. The jurisdiction shall consider rate reductions in excess of ten percent dependent upon the amount of rainwater harvested.

The Department of Ecology is amending WAC 173-152-050 to specifically authorize priority permit processing for rainwater collection systems that do not fall under the permit exemption, and creating a streamlined rainwater collection permit that references RCW 90.03.250 and combines the reservoir and secondary use permits. This permit will be available for both individuals and for regional entities (similar to the already issued Seattle regional permit and the San Juan Island-wide permits currently in process).

The city of Seattle allows rainwater harvesting and requires a permit. But the permit only applies to the parts of the city served by the combined and partially separated basins; those outside those areas cannot get "coverage" through the city's permit. The process for obtaining a permit is still in process.

Taxes: No current state tax incentive

Information Links:

West Virginia - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

West Virginia University (WVU) Tech Briefs

Wisconsin - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

Wyoming - Vendor Directory - Incentives

Statutes: No known statutes or laws.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

No links

US Virgin Islands - Incentives

In the U.S. Virgin Islands, Bermuda, and other Caribbean islands (islands without large reservoirs or adequate groundwater reserves), all new construction and even building expansion must have a provision for a self-sustaining water supply system, either a well or a rainwater collection area and cistern. The rules for private water systems in the Virgin Islands state that new cisterns must have a minimum capacity of 2,500 gallons per dwelling (Virgin Islands Code, Title 29, Public Planning and Development). The U.S. Virgin Islands specifies that cisterns for hotels or multi-family dwellings have a minimum capacity of 10 gallons per square foot of roof area for buildings of one story, and 15 gallons per square foot of roof area for multi-story buildings, although the requirement is waived for buildings with access to centralized potable water systems.

Statutes: Required for all new buildings.

Taxes: Tax

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International - Incentives

Australia

Statutes: Gold Coast, Australia - Mandated rainwater tank installation on new home and business construction.

Taxes: Rebate programs in place in some locations. No known tax credits.

Information Links:

South Australia Plumbing Guide

Australia RWH Guidelines

Gold Coast Water RWH Information

South Austalia Rebate program

SW Government, BASIX, the Building Sustainability Index Tool

Canada

Statutes: No known statues

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Canadian Guidelines for Domestic Reclaimed Water for Use in Toilet and Urinal Flushing

Ontario Guidelines for Residential Rainwater Harvesting Systems

India

Statutes: Several states have Rainwater Harvesting requirements on new construction.

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Summary of Rainwater Harvesting Ordinances in India

Mayalasia

Statutes: No know laws

Taxes: No known tax incentives

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Policies and Incentives

Pakistan

Statutes: No know laws

Taxes: No known tax incentives

Information Links:

Rainwater Harvesting Solution for Drought and Flood Control

United Kingdom

Statutes: Several states have Rainwater Harvesting requirements on new construction.

Taxes: 100% first year capital allowances

Information Links:

Draft British Standard on Rainwater Harvesting

Study on State of RWH in UK

UK Harvesting Rainwater: An informational guide

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FROM: http://www.harvesth2o.com/statues_regulations.shtml


Collecting rainwater now illegal in many states as Big Government claims ownership over our water

Monday, July 26, 2010
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger
Editor of NaturalNews.com (See all articles...)


(NaturalNews) Many of the freedoms we enjoy here in the U.S. are quickly eroding as the nation transforms from the land of the free into the land of the enslaved, but what I'm about to share with you takes the assault on our freedoms to a whole new level. You may not be aware of this, but many Western states, including Utah, Washington and Colorado, have long outlawed individuals from collecting rainwater on their own properties because, according to officials, that rain belongs to someone else.

As bizarre as it sounds, laws restricting property owners from "diverting" water that falls on their own homes and land have been on the books for quite some time in many Western states. Only recently, as droughts and renewed interest in water conservation methods have become more common, have individuals and business owners started butting heads with law enforcement over the practice of collecting rainwater for personal use.

Check out this YouTube video of a news report out of Salt Lake City, Utah, about the issue. It's illegal in Utah to divert rainwater without a valid water right, and Mark Miller of Mark Miller Toyota, found this out the hard way.

After constructing a large rainwater collection system at his new dealership to use for washing new cars, Miller found out that the project was actually an "unlawful diversion of rainwater." Even though it makes logical conservation sense to collect rainwater for this type of use since rain is scarce in Utah, it's still considered a violation of water rights which apparently belong exclusively to Utah's various government bodies.

"Utah's the second driest state in the nation. Our laws probably ought to catch up with that," explained Miller in response to the state's ridiculous rainwater collection ban.

Salt Lake City officials worked out a compromise with Miller and are now permitting him to use "their" rainwater, but the fact that individuals like Miller don't actually own the rainwater that falls on their property is a true indicator of what little freedom we actually have here in the U.S. (Access to the rainwater that falls on your own property seems to be a basic right, wouldn't you agree?)

Outlawing rainwater collection in other states

Utah isn't the only state with rainwater collection bans, either. Colorado and Washington also have rainwater collection restrictions that limit the free use of rainwater, but these restrictions vary among different areas of the states and legislators have passed some laws to help ease the restrictions.

In Colorado, two new laws were recently passed that exempt certain small-scale rainwater collection systems, like the kind people might install on their homes, from collection restrictions.

Prior to the passage of these laws, Douglas County, Colorado, conducted a study on how rainwater collection affects aquifer and groundwater supplies. The study revealed that letting people collect rainwater on their properties actually reduces demand from water facilities and improves conservation.

Personally, I don't think a study was even necessary to come to this obvious conclusion. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that using rainwater instead of tap water is a smart and useful way to conserve this valuable resource, especially in areas like the West where drought is a major concern.

Additionally, the study revealed that only about three percent of Douglas County's precipitation ended up in the streams and rivers that are supposedly being robbed from by rainwater collectors. The other 97 percent either evaporated or seeped into the ground to be used by plants.

This hints at why bureaucrats can't really use the argument that collecting rainwater prevents that water from getting to where it was intended to go. So little of it actually makes it to the final destination that virtually every household could collect many rain barrels worth of rainwater and it would have practically no effect on the amount that ends up in streams and rivers.

It's all about control, really

As long as people remain unaware and uninformed about important issues, the government will continue to chip away at the freedoms we enjoy. The only reason these water restrictions are finally starting to change for the better is because people started to notice and they worked to do something to reverse the law.

Even though these laws restricting water collection have been on the books for more than 100 years in some cases, they're slowly being reversed thanks to efforts by citizens who have decided that enough is enough.

Because if we can't even freely collect the rain that falls all around us, then what, exactly, can we freely do? The rainwater issue highlights a serious overall problem in America today: diminishing freedom and increased government control.

Today, we've basically been reprogrammed to think that we need permission from the government to exercise our inalienable rights, when in fact the government is supposed to derive its power from us. The American Republic was designed so that government would serve the People to protect and uphold freedom and liberty. But increasingly, our own government is restricting people from their rights to engage in commonsense, fundamental actions such as collecting rainwater or buying raw milk from the farmer next door.

Today, we are living under a government that has slowly siphoned off our freedoms, only to occasionally grant us back a few limited ones under the pretense that they're doing us a benevolent favor.

Fight back against enslavement

As long as people believe their rights stem from the government (and not the other way around), they will always be enslaved. And whatever rights and freedoms we think we still have will be quickly eroded by a system of bureaucratic power that seeks only to expand its control.

Because the same argument that's now being used to restrict rainwater collection could, of course, be used to declare that you have no right to the air you breathe, either. After all, governments could declare that air to be somebody else's air, and then they could charge you an "air tax" or an "air royalty" and demand you pay money for every breath that keeps you alive.

Think it couldn't happen? Just give it time. The government already claims it owns your land and house, effectively. If you really think you own your home, just stop paying property taxes and see how long you still "own" it. Your county or city will seize it and then sell it to pay off your "tax debt." That proves who really owns it in the first place... and it's not you!

How about the question of who owns your body? According to the U.S. Patent & Trademark office, U.S. corporations and universities already own 20% of your genetic code. Your own body, they claim, is partially the property of someone else.

So if they own your land, your water and your body, how long before they claim to own your air, your mind and even your soul?

Unless we stand up against this tyranny, it will creep upon us, day after day, until we find ourselves totally enslaved by a world of corporate-government collusion where everything of value is owned by powerful corporations -- all enforced at gunpoint by local law enforcement.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/029286_rainwater_collection_water.html#ixzz1xJ1j8739

RAINWATER HARVESTING

ecord droughts and water-supply worries have spurred state legislatures to consider legislation legalizing the catchment and use of rainwater for use in households and for lawns.

There has been increased interest over the past five years in legislation allowing, defining, and clarifying when rainwater harvesting can occur. Rainwater harvesting is the act of utilizing a collection system to use rainwater for outdoor uses, plumbing, and, in some cases, consumption.

States must ensure water-quality standards and public health concerns are met. In some states, such as Colorado, previous water law stated that all precipitation belonged to existing water-rights owners, and that rain needed to flow to join its rightful water drainage. However, a 2007 study conducted by the Colorado Water Conservation Board and Douglas County determined that only 3 percent of rain actually reached a stream or the ground. This spurred the Colorado legislature to examine the issue further; two pieces of legislation became law, one allowing certain types of well owners to use rainwater and one authorizing pilot development projects.

Texas and Ohio are among states that have devoted a considerable amount of attention to this issue, and have numerous enacted laws regulating the practice of rainwater harvesting. Texas offers a sales tax exemption on the purchase of rainwater harvesting equipment. Both Texas and Ohio allow the practice even for potable purposes.

For updates on pending legislation and past years, please see the NCSL Energy and Environment Legislation Tracking Database

Map of Rainwater Harvesting Laws

 

rainwater law map

 

Arizona

Arizona has a tax credit for water conservation systems that includes collection of rainwater; however, the credit is slated to expire on Jan. 1, 2012. The credit is equal to 25 percent of the cost of the system. The maximum credit in a taxable year may not exceed $1,000. From 2007 to 2010, over $360,000 has been credited to homeowners that purchased some sort of water conservation system. Arizona Revised Statutes §43-1090.01

Colorado

Colorado had some of the strictest laws in the nation prohibiting rainwater harvesting. In 2009, two laws were passed that loosened restrictions.

CO SB 80 allowed residential property owners who rely on certain types of wells to collect and use rainwater. Colorado Revised Statutes §37-90-105

CO HB 1129 authorized 10 pilot projects where captured precipitation was used in new real estate developments for non-potable uses. Colorado Revised Statutes §37-60-115

Resources:

Illinois

In 2009, Illinois created the Green Infrastructure for Clean Water Act which relates to water conservation, efficiency, infrastructure and management while promoting rainwater harvesting. Illinois Revised Statutes Chapter 415 §56

Ohio

Ohio allows rainwater harvesting, even for potable purposes. Private water systems that provide drinking water to fewer than 25 people are regulated by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). Ohio also has a Private Water Systems Advisory Council within the ODH. The nine member council is appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate. Ohio Revised Code §3701.344 and Ohio Revised Code §3701.346

Resources:

Ohio Department of Health Private Water Systems website

Oregon

Since Oregon allows for alternate methods of construction of rainwater harvesting systems, the Oregon Building Codes Division (BCD) created methods for both potable and non-potable systems. Oregon Revised Statute §455.060

Senate Bill 79, passed in 2009, directs the BCD to increase energy efficiency, by including rainwater harvesting, in new and repaired buildings.

Resources:

Texas

Texas Health and Safety Code §341.042 outlines standards for harvested rainwater.

Texas Property Code §202.007 prevents homeowners associations from banning outdoor water-conserving measures, including rainwater harvesting installations. The legislation allows homeowners associations to require screening or shielding to obscure view of the tanks.

Texas Tax Code §151.355 allows for a state sales tax exemption on the purchase of rainwater harvesting equipment.

Resources:

The Texas Manual on Rainwater Harvesting provides information on the practice and outlines sales tax exemptions at the state and local level (pg. 53).

In 2005, the legislature ordered the creation of a Texas Rainwater Harvesting Evaluation Committee; see here for its 2006 Report to Texas Legislature with Recommendations.

The Texas Water Development Board sponsors the Texas Rain Catcher Award to advance the technology, educate the public, and to recognize excellence in the application of rainwater harvesting systems in the state.

Utah

Utah allows for the direct capture and storage of rainwater on land owned or leased by the person responsible for the collection. If a person collects or stores precipitation in an underground storage container, only one container with a maximum capacity of no more than 2,500 gallons may be used. For a covered storage container, no more than two containers may be used, and the maximum storage capacity of any one container shall not be greater than 100 gallons. Utah Code Annotated §73-3-1.5

Virginia

In 2001, Virginia passed Senate Bill 1416, which gave income tax credit to individuals and corporations that installed rainwater harvesting systems. “There is hereby established the Alternative Water Supply Assistance Fund to be administered by the Department to provide grants to localities to be used for entering into agreements with businesses and individuals to harvest and collect rainwater for such uses as determined necessary by the locality, including, but not limited to, irrigation and conservation.”However money has not been allocated for these purposes.

Resources:

Virginia Rainwater Harvesting Manual

Washington

In Washington, state law allows counties to reduce rates for storm water control facilities that utilize rainwater harvesting. Rates may be reduced by a minimum of ten percent for any new or remodeled commercial building. However, the rate can be reduced more than ten percent, depending on the county. Kitsap County’s Ordinance reduces surface and stormwater fees by 50 percent. Washington Revised Code §36.89.080

Uses for harvested rainwater may include water closets, urinals, hose bibbs, industrial applications, and for irrigation purposes. Other uses may be allowed when first approved by the authority having jurisdiction. Washington Revised Code §51-56-1623

Resources:

In 2009, the Washington Department of Ecology issued an Interpretive Policy Statement clarifying that a water right is not required for rooftop rainwater harvesting.

Washington Department of Ecology Rainwater Collection website

U.S. Virgin Islands

Since 1964, the U.S. Virgin Islands has required most buildings to be constructed with a self-sustaining potable water system, such as a well or rainwater collection system.
U.S. Virgin Island Code Title 29 §308

2011 Notable Rainwater Harvesting Legislation

State

Bill

Summary

California

A 275
Vetoed

Enacts the Rainwater Capture Act of 2011. Authorizes residential, commercial, and governmental landowners to install and operate rain barrel systems and rainwater capture systems. Requires a local agency to notify a public water system of any permit program and authorizes a landscape contractor to enter in to a prime contract, if it is used exclusively for landscape irrigation.

Illinois

SB 38 & HB 1585
Pending

Provides that plumbing includes rainwater harvesting distribution systems.

New York

AB 6490
Pending

Creates a tax exemption program in two counties for commercial and residential real property owners who purchase or install systems for rainwater harvesting Counties can adopt such an exemption by resolution.

Texas

TX HB 1728
Enacted

Allows a government or school board to pay for an energy savings performance contract to reduce energy and water use at school facilities. Such a contract may include “rainwater harvesting equipment and equipment to make use of water collected as part of a storm-water system installed for water quality control.”

HB 3372 & SB 1073 Enacted

Relates to rules regarding the installation and maintenance of rainwater harvesting systems that are connected to public water supply systems that are used for indoor potable purposes. These rules must ensure that drinking water standards are met and that harvested rainwater does not come into contact with a public water supply system’s drinking water off location. The law also stipulates that a rainwater harvest system must be installed and maintained by a licensed master plumber.

HB 3391
Enacted

Rainwater harvesting system technology, for potable and non-potable indoor use and landscape watering, must be incorporated into the design and construction of each new state building with a roof measuring at least 50,000 square feet where the average annual rainfall is at least 20 inches. Promotes rainwater harvesting at residential, commercial, and industrial facilities at the local level and directs that county and municipality staffs be trained quarterly by the Texas Water Development Board.

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures, 2011

Find the NCSLstaff member who handles the issue in which you are interested.

NCSLprovides access to current state and federal legislation and a comprehensive list of state documents, including state statutes, constitutions, legislative audits and research reports.

As legislators and legislative staff, you are part of the nation's largest, most influential and only bipartisan organization of state legislators and staff.Learn about the resources NCSL has for you.

NCSL offers an array of services for legislative staff. Find out what's available.

Denver Office
Tel: 303-364-7700 | Fax: 303-364-7800 | 7700 East First Place | Denver, CO 80230

Washington Office
Tel: 202-624-5400 | Fax: 202-737-1069 | 444 North Capitol Street, N.W., Suite 515 | Washington, D.C. 20001

©2012 National Conference of State Legislatures. All Rights Reserved.

 

Collecting rain water for drinking...

Posted by STROBE zn 7b BHAM, AL (My Page) on
Tue, Jan 13, 04 at 12:38

Is this possible? Are there too many chemicals/bacteria/other things in the water? I have read all the posts here on collecting water for gardening. I know I have to cover the top to keep mosquitoes out and everything.

Does anyone have any rain barrels set up for drinking water? Surely I would have to have a filtering system, right?

Any thoughts, ideas, suggestions??

Jackie/STROBE


Follow-Up Postings:

 o

RE: Collecting rain water for drinking...

Here's a good site.

Here is a link that might be useful: rainwater harvesting


 o

RE: Collecting rain water for drinking...

our family lived in Viet Nam before we came to tx, we collect rain water for drinking only, rain water is the best clean source of water that we can have. usually, the first couple rains in the season are have lots of polution in them and we don't collect until mid season. however, the best time to collect rain water is in winter and during a second day of continuos rain. we collect and store water in a large 55-70gal clay barrel. the clay barrel actualy do a good job of keep the water clean and cool. don't be alarm when you see mosquitos and things live on the bottom of the containers, they are harmless creatures no matter what you do, you can never get rid of them, just make sure that you don't swallow them.
i remember when my grand still alive, she put a pumkin in to a full rain water clay-barrel (rain water only!)and seal the lid up. the pumkin start to rotten in there for years by the time she reopen the pumkin remain is just some settlement on the bottom of the barrel. she said that the pumkin help reduce axiety and purify the water, it also help to boot up the immune system, the recipe has been passing through generations in our family and unfotunate there are no clay-barrel here so i can't keep the recipe going!


 o

RE: Collecting rain water for drinking...

How interesting! We will be retiring to new mexico, and hope to have a cistern system installed. Just another area to look into for inexpensive filtration, lol.....Cheri


 o

RE: Collecting rain water for drinking...

We are building a new house and it is becoming more common to use rainwater as an alternative to wells. We had the choice and decided to do rainwater for our house. This isnt cheap (17K for 20,000 gallon tanks & UV filters, pump, etc) but the well would be almost the same costs. With all the new construction in our area, many wells are going dry so this seems like the best solution. During droughts, water can be brought out on a truck (+-$50 for 5,000 gallons). The water is filtered off the roof (we are having metal roof), the 1st wash is stored in a separate container for landscape watering then the rest is stored in 2 tanks. Tanks have a UV filter. No need for water softners because the water is really soft and clean. The company putting our system in even sells bottled rainwater at groceries around here. Our county also offers dollar for dollar reduction on property taxes for any expense related to building the system (roof, gutters, etc). I would be interested in hearing from anyone who has this kind of system, but our research shows it is well liked.


 o

RE: Collecting rain water for drinking...

most of the smaller inhabited islands of the Bahamas have been using cisterns for their water source for a long time


 o

RE: Collecting rain water for drinking...

  • Posted by kapi Netherlands (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 29, 05 at 4:32

Hi, I'm writing about my house in the French Alps. Previously, we had a spring there for a water source but it seems to have dried up. We had a drought two years ago and a fairly dry summer after that. This summers also promises a drought. We are looking for more springs, but in the meantime, I am wondering how to start an underground watertank to keep water for the dry months. If anybody has information on that, I would be obliged. I'm also interested in mountain plants that would be drought resistant. I already have some lavendar and thyme. Thanks for your input.


 o

RE: Collecting rain water for drinking...

"most of the smaller inhabited islands of the Bahamas have been using cisterns for their water source for a long time"

I grew up in upper Eastern Tennessee and cisterns were very common. My family used a cistern until I started high school in 1967. My dad treated it with Clorox and added a little alumn to coagulate loose particles. We had a lever that would divert the rain water to the cisten and had no problems.

Eventually the city ran a line up the mountain to a doctor who lived up the road from us so we tapped into it and covered the cistern. The only difference between the two was the rain water was free and the city charged.



RAIN BARREL
Effective Economical Rainwater Harvesting System to provide all water used in the home. Includes making a 32 mm water diverter and primary and secondary flush system with 25 micron water butt inlet filter sock, 5 micron filter and housing. Hope you enjoy building one of these.

Drinking filtered rainwater free of chlorine, fluoride, pesticides, fertilizers, farm animal waste, wildfowl and fish waste makes more sense to me and tastes beautiful compared to the chemically treated mains water. A Pond UV Sterilizer can be added to make sure its pathogen free. We use a Doulton ceramic candle filter and housing for bathroom wash basin cold and for an additional filtered rainwater supply in the kitchen.

A double stopcock system has been installed to switch from rainwater to mains when tank is empty.

Would have liked a 3,500 litre tank, settled for a 2,700 litre tank for £155 Ebay
B&Q best for 32 mm pipe guttering and connectors. Toolstation for MDPE Pipe and , guttering, downpipe converter, fittings, Soil Pipe, fittings. Recycle centre for patio table legs. Maplin for Junior Hippo Water Pump..

Total Outlay: £620.00 Had some amazing bargains from Ebay

A first flush system is usually a 4 inch soil pipe, capped off at the bottom with a screw cap end so it can be cleaned out occasionally. The end cap is drilled and a continuous drip tap is fitted so that the flush system drains between showers. This reduces maintenance. The top of the pipe is reduced down to 32 mm or larger to take all of the rain from the roof. Water flows from the down pipe into a Y junction. Waste Push Fit 32mm fittings are ideal for this and inexpensive. Water enters the Y junction or T junction and rapidly fills the length of 4” pipe, usually around 4 feet minimum. Inside there is a plastic hollow ball that floats up and closes the first flush system when filled allowing clean water to flow into the Water Butt via a filter sock,

The first flush system is a simple effective method of removing insects, bird droppings and other debris every time it rains, by washing it into the 1st Flush, where the ball float seals it in and debris settles to the bottom.

In Rural India and other developing countries, this first flush system is the only filter they use and the water collected is drank by everyone, even imported into the cities and sold to people who can’t drink the chlorinated chemically treated mains water.

We could learn a lot for these people.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yf2CUYCWgko Here is one in action. Although no ball float was used in this design.

WATER  TANK

WATER TAML

RAINWATER SYSTEM

RAIN WATER SYSTEM

Modified the Hippo Pump installation, due to an oversight on my part. Drilled small hole close to the top of the 45 gallon barrel , cut plug off and pulled cable through.

Having the pump flex going through a screw on lid means when you unscrew or screw it you tend to coil the flex around the 32 mil pipe attached to the pump. Obvious really. This lid needs to be removed fairly often to wash out the 25 micron filter soc on the inlet.

Having the push fit end on the inlet as shown in the slide show makes it very easy to remove the filter sock and replace it.

The filter socks wash in cold water, turned inside out and brushed lightly to remove silt. You can tell when the filter needs cleaning because the water backs up the down-pipe due to restricted inflow.

Washed the filter socks out 3 times now and not harmed by the process.
« Last Edit: 08/10/2008 17:44:03 by Andrew K Fletcher »


Mike wanted to collect all of the water the family needed off their roof. They had never been big water users - despite running the washing machine every day, showering and doing all the normal things a family of four does. Even before they renovated, they used just 350 litres of water a day, or about half that of the average Sydney household. But over a year, this still adds up to around 100 000 litres of water.

The biggest issue in collecting rainwater is keeping it free of muck such as leaves, bird droppings and dead animals, and avoiding contamination with pollutants like heavy metals and dust. The Chippendale house has four simple but clever adaptions to get around this.

  • the enclosed gutter on the roof excludes leaves and bird droppings but lets water in through special sinks
  • the downpipe contains a sloping mesh trap to exclude leaves and debris without blocking water flow
  • a simple diversion system in the downpipe directs the first 6-10 litres of rainwater (carrying dirt from the roof) away from the water tank and into the garden, and
  • a sump with a fine mesh excludes the last of the heavy sediments before the water enters the tank

The guttering system feeds into a concrete tank hidden below the house's back deck that holds about 8500 litres. When it's full the water overflows into a mini-wetland to reduce stormwater runoff from the block.

tap waterYou can drink that stuff...!!?



The house is less than 2 kilometres from Sydney's CBD, sandwiched between two congested inner-city roads (Broadway and Cleveland St) choked frequently with buses and cars. So with two young kids, Mike and Heather were initially concerned about the quality of the water they'd collect off their roof. They were pleasantly surprised. Today, their drinking water is cleaner than that most households (Sydney's Giardia and Cryptosporidium scares made them even more smug!). Test carried out by the University of Technology Sydney, demonstrate consistently low turbidity and faecal coliform counts and, importantly, the highest level of lead ever measured recorded in the tank water was 0.03 mg/litre - below the safety threshold of 0.05 mg/litre recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council in 1991.

The Bottom Line ...

The tank system has had its problems. The family has run out of rainwater four times, which meant popping across to the neighbours to "borrow" 1500 litres of water occasionally. Installing a bigger tank would have alleviated this problem, but not solved it - there simply isn't enough rainfall on their tiny roof to sustain the family's needs. It would be enough for two.

These shortfalls aside, the system has served them well and means that an extra 100 000 litres of fresh water stays in the local dam each year.

 

from:  http://www.abc.net.au/science/planet/house/drink.htm

 

 

MORE FROM:?    http://search.babylon.com/?s=web&babsrc=HP_Prot&rlz=0&q=collecting+rainwater+for+drinking

 

 

 

also see:  http://www.greatdreams.com/survivaol.htm

 

 

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