SOLAR WEATHER and some interesting space stuff

 

 

 

 

SOLAR WEATHER
and some interesting space stuff

2010

compiled by Dee Finney

NEVEMBER - 2010

PAGE 11

updated  -  11-30-10

 

THIS COMPILATION IS BEING DONE IN HONOR OF KENT STEADMAN
OF  www.cyberspaceorbit.com  who left his earthly abode in 2008

 

2008 SOLAR WEATHER

 

2009 SOLAR WEATHER
JANUARY - FEBRUARY - MARCH - APRIL - MAY  - JUNE - JULY -
AUGUST - SEPTEMBER - OCTOBER - NOVEMBER - DECEMBER

 

2010 SOLAR WEATHER

JANUARY - FEBRUARY - MARCH - APRIL - MAY - JUNE - JULY
AUGUST - SEPTEMBER - OCTOBER - NOVEMBER  - DECEMBER

 

 

 

On January 17, there were 1092 potentially hazardous asteroids.
On February 17, there were 1100 potentially hazardous asteroids.
NOTE:  These are not 'new' asteroids'  merely newly discovered by people and their new telescopes.
On March 24, there were 1110 potentially hazardous asteroids.
On April 5, there are 1110 potentially hazardous asteroids.
On April 14, there are 1117 potentially hazardous asteroids.

On May 15, there are 1127 potentionally hazardous asteroids.
On June 19, there are 1133 potentially hazardous asteroids.
On June 23, there are 1138 potentially hazardous asteroids.
On July 23, there are 1140 potentially hazardous asteroids.
On August 12, there are 1142 potentially hazardous asteroids.
On September 3, there are 1144 potentially hazardous asteroids.

On October 8, there are 1149 potentially hazardous asteroids.

 

ONE YEAR UNTIL THE METEOR OUTBURST: Every year around Oct. 8th, Earth passes through a minefield of dusty debris from Comet Giacobini-Zinner, source of the annual Draconid meteor shower. This year, forecasters expect Earth to narrowly miss several of the debris streams, resulting in no appreciable display for 2010. Next year, however, could be different. On Oct. 8, 2011, Earth will have a near head-on collision with a tendril of dust, setting off a strong outburst of as many as 750 meteors per hour. People in Europe, Africa and the Middle East will have a front-row seat for what could be the strongest shower since the Leonid storms a decade ago. Mark your calendar and, meanwhile, follow these links for more information: Draconid forecasts; sky map; history;

 

 

 


STRANGE SUN AND MOON PHENOMENA - OCTOBER 2010

http://beforeitsnews.com/story/229/227/HUGE_media_blackout_regarding_Earth_and_Moon_orbital_changes.html

HUGE Media Blackout Regarding Earth and Moon Orbital Changes?
Huge earth changes are taking place at this time. L.A. had a record cool summer and a few days after summer is over, they shoot up to a record high 113 degrees. Parts of Brazil and Bolivia shattered record cold temps and were colder than Antarctica for much of July, killing millions of fish, and many alligators and fresh water dolphins! Weather is going crazy around the world and all the mainstream media talks about is "climate change" "global warming"...etc. But they won't touch upon the True Cause, because for them it is too alarming.

An increasing number of people around the world have witnessed amazing changes in the location of Sun rise and set in summer and winter. Apparently this is being caused by the earth moving below the old ecliptic plane in summer and above it in winter! The moon is also playing rodeo all over the sky....and the media says nothing. I have read of reports (as yet unsubstantiated) that a "gag order" is in place and professionals dealing with the subject have had to sign non-disclosure agreements regarding these facts. The Inuit peoples of the high arctic have published several stories regarding the changes in sun position at their locations and were told by a meteorologist that it is an "optical phenomenon unique to the extremely high horizon". Yet these changes are visible all over the world. Ordinary citizens from all over the world are reporting their observations regarding the sun and moon changing their positions in the sky. And we're not just talking inches here. The changes are amazing to say the least! The furthest north the sun traditionally appeared for thousands of years, was the tropic of cancer which passes through central Mexico, yet now, at the beginning of summer, it can be witnessed to rise in the direction of Maine and set in the direction of Seattle.

And according to the universities, the highest latitude that the moon reaches, is 28.5 degrees, yet for the last couple years at least, it has transgressed that number by a significant margin! One can watch the moon rise low in the south east and set in the southwest, at least from my position at 41 degrees north in the Midwest U.S. and then, within two weeks time, it will rise high in the northeast and set in the northwest!

According to WIRED magazine and others, scientists are perplexed at the mysterious high tides, and reports of "giant rogue waves" coming out of the clear blue, and Tsunami are on the increase, as are earthquakes in populated areas around the world. Changes in the sun are being documented at a dizzying pace these days as well, and on the same day that a large asteroid hit Jupiter this summer, something impacted Venus. These were observed on the same day!

One can easily observe the sun rising too far north in summer and too far south in winter and these changes are, themselves, in a state of change.

I have assembled a long list of reputable sources of information in support of my observations and those of others, that these events are indeed taking place.

Please Google - "Late Harvest Moon BHM" and wade through 5 pages of prolific evidence of these events now taking place.

As a reader of 'Before it's news', I just thought that those among your readers who are interested, should have the opportunity to research these things for themselves.

TS

UPDATE:

Tracking huge global changes, as I have been doing for quite awhile now, I've seen various 'cause and effect' relationships between certain phenomenon. One example is that as the moon nears it's new northern limit each month, a large earthquake occurs, usually in the southern hemisphere. I have informed readers at various locations on the net to be aware of this relationship, which seems to be occurring rather like clockwork as of late. As of this writing, I have documented 4 examples of this apparent relationship, including the Christ Church New Zealand quake, and the 7.7 quake which just occurred. The rise and descent angles of the moon at it's northern most point, which it is nearing as we speak, tell a strange story indeed. For if one projects an imaginary arc continuing down below the horizon upon moon rise and set, in accordance with it's visible ascent/descent vectors, one can clearly see that the moon is not orbiting the center mass of the planet at this time. This spiraling orbit seems to have been set in motion as earth's orbit rises above the old ecliptic plane in winter and dips slightly below it in summer. It is at these times, start of winter and summer, that the moon would have been influenced to begin orbiting in the manner currently being displayed, which also would account for the sun rising and setting so far north in summer and south in winter. Think of how miniscule the change in earth orbit would have to be for us to witness a major change in latitude for sun rise/set, commensurate with changes in rise/set angles, which are surely what seem to be occurring at this time!

I kept track of the sun last summer, from my position at 40 degrees north latitude in the Midwest U.S.. For almost a month or so, a couple weeks before and after June 21st, I could watch the sun rise at an odd angle roughly in the direction of Maine, and descend at the same strange angle toward sunset, roughly in the direction of Seattle. What really piqued my interest was that the sun's after glow was visible well after sundown and this eerie glow proceeded northward and was quite visible until about 1:30AM disappearing until about 3:30AM as the glow crossed beneath the north pole, then began to glow brighter and brighter until the sun popped up in the north east.

This seems to be a sure indicator that earth's orbit has changed and is moving slightly above the old ecliptic plane in winter, and slightly below it in summer! Such activity would also account for the moon's new orbital track, initiated at winter or summer solstice and exacerbated at those points in earth's orbit. These changes are constantly in flux due to an intimidating number of cosmic/physics variables!

As the moon reaches it's monthly northern 11-16-10limit over the next few days, pay particular attention to it's rise and set angles, it's apparent planar traversing arc, and you will see that it clearly cannot be orbiting the earth's center mass. As one waits a couple weeks or so and views it's orbit at it's southern extreme, one may realize that it does not take a physics expert to determine that the moon's orbit has changed considerably and is orbiting in a 'spiral' fashion, rising and setting WELL north of the moon's traditional declination of 28.5 degrees

 

 

   
   

  11-30-10  sunspot 1130 developing

Solar wind
speed:
376.9 km/sec
density: 0.2 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1116 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B2 0838 UT Nov30
24-hr: B3 0134 UT Nov30
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1100 UT

LONG-DELAY RADIO ECHOES: During the geomagnetic storm of Nov. 27th, a brief but intense G2-class event, amateur radio operator Peter Brogl of Fürth, Germany experienced a strange phenomenon. Forty-six seconds after he transmitted his call sign at 7 MHz, he received an echo of his own transmission. "At first, I thought someone was playing tricks on me," says Brogl, "but I changed frequency, re-keyed my call sign (DK6NP), and got another echo." This went on for more than an hour, enough time for Brogl to make several recordings. First reported in 1927 by Norwegian civil engineer Jørgen Hals, long-delay radio echoes are rare and poorly understood. Unusual propagation conditions linked to solar storms is one of many possible explanations.

SUNSPOT CANOPY: Two days ago, sunspot 1130 didn't exist. Now the fast-growing sunspot group is the largest visible feature on the sun's disk with twin cores both larger than Earth. The amazing thing, however, is the invisible part. Using extreme ultraviolet filters outside the range of human vision, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory took this picture of the sunspot's magnetic canopy on Nov. 30th:

sunspo canopy

In the image, curvaceous lines of magnetism are illuminated by hot solar plasma trapped inside the canopy. If the magnetic field becomes unstable and explodes, as sunspot magnetic fields tend to do, a cloud of plasma could come flying toward Earth. This active region merits watching for the next few days until the sun's rotation turns it away from our planet.

  11-29-10  sunspot 1130

Solar wind
speed: 367.5 km/sec
density: 0.7 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2346 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1 1939 UT Nov29
24-hr: B2 1447 UT Nov29
explanation |
more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

NEW SUNSPOT: New sunspot 1130 is rapidly developing near the center of the sun's disk and "it is crackling with activity," reports Michael Borman of Evansville, Indiana. Using a backyard solar telescope, he took this picture of a B-class explosion from the active region on Nov. 28th. So far, the flares have been relatively minor, but if the sunspot's growth continues apace, geo-effective blasts could be in the offing.

  11-28-19 

Solar wind
speed: 442.0 km/sec
density: 0.3 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B2
1754 UT Nov28
24-hr: B2 1754 UT Nov28
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

COMET HARTLEY 2: Comet Hartley 2 is putting on a show for amateur astronomers. Tonight, the amazing green comet glides midway between two star clusters, M46 and M47, in the southern constellation Puppis. George Ionas of Palmerston North, New Zealand, made a two hour movie of the comet's approach on Nov. 28th. "This is a pretty sight in backyard telescopes as the comet stilll has a fairly bright nucleus," he says. Astrophotographers who wish to monitor the encounter can point their telescopes using this ephemeris and sky map.

more images: from Rolando Ligustri and from J.D. Strikis, both using robotic telescopes in New Mexico

  11-27-10  sunspot 1127 is fading


Solar wind
speed: 366.6 km/sec
density: 7.9 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1746 UT
X-ray Solar Flares

6-hr max: A7 1650 UT Nov27
24-hr: A7 1650 UT Nov27
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1700 UT

SUNSPOT GENESIS: A new sunspot is rapidly coelescing near the sun's southwestern limb today: finder chart. Readers with solar telescopes are encouraged to look. It's a nice opportunity to witness sunspot genesis in action.

FARSIDE ACTIVITY: The far side of the sun is alive with activity. On Nov. 26th, NASA's twin STEREO spacecraft and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) observed two farside coronal mass ejections (CMEs) billowing into space. This one came from old sunspot 1126, located just over the sun's southwestern horizon:


Click to play a 3 MB gif animation

Hours later, a second CME followed, but not from the same blast site. The second CME came from an active region near the sun's anti-Earth point, almost directly opposite our planet on the solar farside. If Earth were on the other side of the sun, we would be be expecting bright auroras from the impact of these clouds. Instead, the alert is for "all quiet." Nothing major is heading our way.

The farside active regions that produced these eruptions will turn to face Earth in 7 to 14 days. Will they remain active that long? Stay tuned for updates.

more movies: (1) Both CMEs observed by STEREO-B; (2) The eruption of old sunspot 1126 observed by STEREO-A. Watch the STEREO-A movie all the way to the end. The eruption occurs in the final third of the movie.


  11-26-10  sunspot 1128 poses no threat

FARSIDE ACTIVITY: The far side of the sun is alive with activity. Today, NASA's twin STEREO spacecraft and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) have observed two farside coronal mass ejections (CMEs) billowing into space. This one came from old sunspot 1126, located just over the sun's southwestern horizon:


Click to play a 3 MB gif animation

Hours later, a second CME followed, but not from the same blast site. The second CME came from an active region near the sun's anti-Earth point, almost directly opposite our planet on the solar farside.

If Earth were on the other side of the sun, we would be be expecting bright auroras from the impact of these clouds. Instead, the alert is for "all quiet." Nothing major is heading our way.

The farside active regions that produced these eruptions will turn to face Earth in 7 to 14 days. Will they remain active that long? Stay tuned for updates from the farside.



Solar wind
speed: 338.4 km/sec
density: 1.5 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: A5 1834 UT Nov26
24-hr: A6 0000 UT Nov26
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT
  11-25-10  sunspot

dodging bullets


Solar wind
speed: 426.0 km/sec
density: 0.2 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B3 2130 UT Nov25

24-hr: B3 2130 UT Nov25
explanation | more data

Updated: Today at: 2300 UT
  11-24-10  sunspots  1127 is decaying

Solar wind
speed: 465.2 km/sec
density: 1.2 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1 1723 UT Nov24
24-hr: B1 1723 UT Nov24
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

ALIEN COMETS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM: Some of the comets in our Solar System probably came from other stars, according to new research by NASA-supported scientists. Studying these 'alien' comets, they say, could reveal new information about stellar systems far, far away. Get the full story from Science@NASA.

  11-23-10  There are 7 active sunspots today

X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max:
C1 1700 UT Nov23
24-hr: M9 2330 UT Nov22
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2245 UT

RADIATION STORM: The Thanksgiving Day explosion near sunspot 9704 also sparked an M9.9-class solar flare. Energetic protons accelerated by the flare and by the incoming CME are streaming past Earth in great numbers. As a result, a strong S3-class radiation storm is in progress around our planet.


  11-22-10  There are 5 active sunspots facing earth today

Solar Wind
velocity: 456.5 km/s
density:
3.4 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2245 UT

X-ray Solar Flares

6-hr max:
M3 2035 UT Nov22
24-hr: M3 2035 UT Nov22
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2245 UT


  11-21-10  sunspots  1124, 1125, 1127

Solar wind
speed: 401.4 km/sec
density: 1.0 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1044 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1 0421 UT Nov21
24-hr: B1 0054 UT Nov21
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1000 UT


LEONID RECAP: Earth is exiting a thicket of debris from Comet Tempel-Tuttle, source of the annual Leonid meteor shower. According to international counts, the shower crested on Nov. 17th and 18th with a peak rate of 20 meteors per hour. Compared to, say, the Leonid storms of a decade ago, it was not an impressive display--that is, unless you added it up for five nights in a row:


Leonids 2019

These are all the Leonid fireballs I recorded from Nov. 13th to Nov. 18th," says Jim Gamble, who operates an all-sky camera in El Paso, Texas. "In total, there were 16 Leonids of magnitude -3 or brighter." Considering that Earth missed the densest part of the Leonid debris stream in 2010, more than a dozen fireballs is a good haul.

A bigger display is coming: In early December, Earth will enter a cloud of debris from extinct comet Phaethon, setting off the annual Geminid meteor shower. On peak night, Dec. 14th, forecasters expect as many as 100 meteors per hour, five times greater than the waning Leonids. Stay tuned!

more images: from Yuichi Takasaka of Gingolx (Kincolith), British Columbia, Canada; from Thomas Kerns of Homer, Alaska; from Yaron Eini of Jerusalem, Israel;


  11-20-10  sunspots 1124, 1125, 1127

Solar wind
speed: 412.8 km/sec
density: 0.4 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1836 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1 1643 UT Nov20
24-hr: B2 0428 UT Nov20
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1800 UT

They are saying "Another doomed comet".  I'm seeing UFOs too.
comet-ufos
  11-19-10  sunspots 1123. 1124, 1125

sundiver

 

Play it again and note how the head of the comet is shrinking and dimming. The icy visitor from the outer solar system is evaporating before our very eyes.

On Nov. 14th, another comet followed the same path and met the same fate. It's no coincidence. Both are fragments of a giant parent comet that broke apart about 2000 years ago. Astronomers call them "Kruetz sungrazers" after the 19th century German researcher, Heinrich Kreutz, who studied them in detail. According to some estimates, several Kruetz comets pass by the sun and disintegrate every day. Most are too small to see, but occasionally a large fragment (or two) attracts attention.



11-18-10  sunspots  1124. 1125

Solar wind
speed: 557.3 km/sec
density: 0.7 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B2
2051 UT Nov18
24-hr: B4
0653 UT Nov18
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT


Comet Snowstorm Engulfs Hartley 2

Nov. 18, 2010:  NASA has just issued a travel advisory for spacecraft: Watch out for Comet Hartley 2, it is experiencing a significant winter snowstorm.

Deep Impact photographed the unexpected tempest when it flew past the comet's nucleus on Nov. 4th at a distance of only 700 km (435 miles). At first, researchers only noticed the comet's hyperactive jets. The icy nucleus is studded with them, flamboyantly spewing carbon dioxide from dozens of sites. A closer look revealed an even greater marvel, however. The space around the comet's core is glistening with chunks of ice and snow, some of them possibly as large as a basketball.

 

comet snowstorm

This contrast-enhanced image obtained during Deep Impact's Nov. 4th flyby of Comet Hartley 2 reveals a cloud of icy particles surrounding the comet's active nucleus. [larger image]

"We've never seen anything like this before," says University of Maryland professor Mike A'Hearn, principal investigator of Deep Impact's EPOXI mission. "It really took us by surprise."

Before the flyby of Hartley 2, international spacecraft visited four other comet cores—Halley, Borrelly, Wild 2, and Tempel 1. None was surrounded by "comet snow." Tempel 1 is particularly telling because Deep Impact itself performed the flyby. The very same high resolution, high dynamic range cameras that recorded snow-chunks swirling around Hartley 2 did not detect anything similar around Tempel 1.

"This is a genuinely new phenomenon," says science team member Jessica Sunshine of the University of Maryland. "Comet Hartley 2 is not like the other comets we've visited."

The 'snowstorm' occupies a roughly-spherical volume centered on Hartley 2's spinning nucleus. The dumbbell-shaped nucleus, measuring only 2 km from end to end, is tiny compared to the surrounding swarm. "The ice cloud is a few tens of kilometers wide--and possibly much larger than that," says A'Hearn. "We still don't know for sure how big it is."

Data collected by Deep Impact's onboard infrared spectrometer show without a doubt that the particles are made of frozen H2O, i.e., ice. Chunks consist of micron-sized ice grains loosely stuck together in clumps a few centimeters to a few tens of centimeters wide.

MORE AT:  http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/18nov_cometsnowstorm/

 

 

  11-17-10

Solar wind
speed: 346.6 km/sec
density: 0.2 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1946 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B2
1847 UT Nov19
24-hr: B2
1847 UT Nov19
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1900 UT
  11-16-10  sunspots  1124, 1125

Solar wind
speed: 500.3 km/sec
density: 0.0 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B3 2255 UT Nov16
24-hr: B4 0038 UT Nov16
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT
  11-15-19  sunspots 1124 , 1125

Solar wind
speed: 500.3 km/sec
density: 0.0 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B3 2255 UT Nov16
24-hr: B4 0038 UT Nov16
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

  11-14-10  sunspots 1123. 1124, 1125

Solar wind
speed: 725.0 km/sec
density: 0.6 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B2 2206 UT Nov14
24-hr: C1 0001 UT Nov14
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

LEONID METEOR SHOWER: The annual Leonid meteor shower peaks this year on Nov. 17th when Earth passes through a thicket of debris from Comet Tempel-Tuttle. Earth is expected to miss the densest swarms of comet dust, making this an off-year for Leonids with a maximum of only 20 meteors per hour.

  11-13-10  sunspots 1123, 1124, 1125

Solar wind
speed: 725.0 km/sec
density: 0.6 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B2 2206 UT Nov14
24-hr: C1 0001 UT Nov14
explanation | more data

Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

SUNDIVING COMET:
The solar system has one less comet today after one of the dirty snowballs swung past the sun--a little too close--and did not survive. Click on the image to view a movie of the death plunge

comet diving

  11-12-10  - sunspot 1123

Solar wind
speed: 524.8 km/sec
density: 0.3 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 0956 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: C1 0811 UT Nov12
24-hr: C4 0134 UT Nov12
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1000 UT

EARTH-DIRECTED ERUPTION: Active sunspot 1123 erupted during the early hours of Nov. 12th, producing a C4-class solar flare and apparently hurling a filament of material in the general direction of Earth. Click on the image to play a three and a half hour (0000 - 0330 UT) time lapse movie of the event:

sunspot 1123
Movie formats: 1.4 MB gif, 0.5 MB iPad, 0.3 MB iPhone. Credit: SDO

Coronagraph images from NASA's twin STEREO spacecraft show a coronal mass ejection (CME) emerging from the blast site and heading off in a direction just south of the sun-Earth line. The cloud could deliver a glancing blow to Earth's magnetic field sometime on Nov. 14th or 15th, sparking auroras. Stay tuned for refined predictions later today when SOHO images of the CME become available.

JUPITER'S MISSING STRIPE, RETURNING? Earlier this year when Jupiter's great South Equatorial Belt (SEB) vanished, researchers urged amateur astronomers to be alert for its eventual return. The SEB had come and gone before, they noted, and the revival was something to behold. Alert: It might be happening now. After months of quiet in Jupiter's south equatorial zone, a white plume is surging through the cloudtops where the SEB should be. Christopher Go of the Philippines took this picture on Nov. 9th:

jupiter no stripe 2010

It might not look like much, but this is how a revival of the SEB begins--a small disturbance in the upper atmosphere heralds a much larger profusion of spots and swirls bursting forth around the whole circumference of the giant planet. Amid the confusion, Jupiter's vast brown stripe emerges.

Subsequent observations by astronomers in the United States, Japan, and the Philippines not only confirm the plume, but also show it brightening rapidly. Indeed, as Nov. 12th unfolds, it is the single brightest spot on Jupiter in wavebands ranging from infrared to ultraviolet.

"This plume is so energetic that we can confidently expect it to develop into the SEB Revival," says John Rogers, director of the Jupiter section of the British Astronomical Association. "The SEB Revival is usually spectacular, so we can expect impressive and rapidly changing disturbances over the next 3 months."

Experienced planetary photographers are encouraged to monitor developments. If events proceed apace, the Revival could become visible to novices using small backyard telescopes, so stay tuned.


  11-11-10  sunspots  1021 and 1022

speed: 457.9 km/sec
density: 1.1 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2340 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: C1 1942 UT Nov11
24-hr: C4 0724 UT Nov11
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

JUPITER'S MISSING STRIPE, RETURNING? Earlier this year when Jupiter's great South Equatorial Belt (SEB) vanished, researchers urged amateur astronomers to be alert for its eventual return. The SEB had come and gone before, they noted, and the revival was something to behold. Alert: It might be happening now. After months of quiet in Jupiter's south equatorial zone, a white plume is surging through the cloudtops where the SEB should be. Christopher Go of the Philippines took this picture on Nov. 9th:


It might not look like much, but this is how a revival of the SEB begins--a small disturbance in the upper atmosphere heralds a much larger profusion of spots and swirls bursting forth around the whole circumference of the giant planet. Amid the confusion, Jupiter's vast brown stripe emerges.

Subsequent observations by astronomers in the United States, Japan, and the Philippines not only confirm the plume, but also show it brightening rapidly. Indeed, as Nov. 11th unfolds, it is the single brightest spot on Jupiter in wavebands ranging from infrared to ultraviolet.

"This plume is so energetic that we can confidently expect it to develop into the SEB Revival," says John Rogers, director of the Jupiter section of the British Astronomical Association. "The SEB Revival is usually spectacular, so we can expect impressive and rapidly changing disturbances over the next 3 months."

Experienced planetary photographers are encouraged to monitor developments. If events proceed apace, the Revival could become visible to novices using small backyard telescopes, so stay tuned.

CRACKLING SUNSPOTS: Sunspot complex 1121-1123 crackling with C-class solar flares, producing more than five such eruptions in the past 24 hours. With so much activity going on, it is easy to catch the region in mid-flare, as Michael Buxton did this morning from his backyard observatory in Ocean Beach, California

 

  11-10-10  sunspots  1021 and 1022

Solar wind
speed: 313.1 km/sec
density: 1.8 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B6 2255 UT Nov10
24-hr: B9 1639 UT Nov10
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

ACTIVITY ON JUPITER: Earlier this year when Jupiter's great South Equatorial Belt (SEB) vanished, researchers urged amateur astronomers to be alert for its eventual return. The SEB had come and gone before, they noted, and the revival was something to behold. Alert: It might be happening now. After months of quiet in Jupiter's south equatorial zone, a white spot is rapidly forming where the SEB should be. Christopher Go of the Philippines took this picture on Nov. 9th:


It might not look like much, but this is how a revival of the SEB begins--a small disturbance in the upper atmosphere heralds a sudden profusion of spots and swirls. Amid the confusion, Jupiter's vast brown stripe emerges.

The existence of this spot has reportedly been confirmed by astrophotographer Donald Parker of Coral Gables, Florida, and Go himself saw it again on Nov. 10th. "The 'SEB outbreak spot' is also prominent in ultraviolet and methane band filters," notes Go. "This spot should grow bigger in the coming days."

Experienced planetary photographers are encouraged to monitor Jupiter for further developments.

  11-09-10  sunspot 1021 and 1022

Solar wind
speed: 365.2 km/sec
density: 0.0 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2323 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1 1842 UT Nov09
24-hr: B3 1400 UT Nov09
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

COMET OUTBURST: Comet Ikeya-Murakami (C/2010 V1) is definitely undergoing an outburst event. Italian astronomers Ernesto Guido and Giovanni Sostero assembled the following animation from images they obtained between Nov. 4th and Nov 9th:



comet Ikeya outburst

The sequence clearly shows an explosion in progress. "Only Nov. 7th is missing," they say, "because of rare cloudy skies over New Mexico, where the remotely-controlled telescope we used is located."

Another New Mexico observer, Leonid Elenin, estimates the size of comet's expanding atmosphere as 4x6 arcminutes. "There is also some evidence of two symmetrical jets emerging from the nucleus of the comet," he says.

The behavior of this comet reminds many onlookers of exploding Comet Holmes in 2007. Researchers believe Holmes exploded when an icy cavern in the comet's nucleus collapsed. Perhaps something similar has happened to Comet Ikeya-Murakami. The icy visitor from the outer solar system made its closest approach to the Sun in late October, so it has just received a dose of solar heating that could trigger such an event.

Amateur astronomers are encouraged to monitor developments. Various reports put the brightness of the comet between 7th and 9th magnitude, invisible to the naked eye but an easy target for telescopes such as the Comet Hunter. It's easy to find, too, little more than a degree from Saturn in the eastern sky before dawn. Set your alarm and happy hunting! [Sky maps: Nov. 9, 10, 11] [3D orbit] [ephemeris]

more images: from Joseph Brimacombe using a robotic telescope in New Mexico (Nov.8); from Gil Esquerdo of Whipple Observatory, Mt. Hopkins, Arizona (Nov. 8); from Tenho Tuomi of Lucky Lake, SK, Canada (Nov. 7); from Gregg Ruppel of Ellisville, Missouri (Nov. 7); from Feys Filip of Crete, Greece (Nov. 6); from Gregg Ruppel of Ellisville, Missouri (Nov. 6); from Gregg Ruppel of Ellisville, Missouri (Nov. 5); from Luca Buzzi of the G.V. Schiaparelli Astronomical Observatory in Varese, Italy (Nov. 4);

 


  11-08-10  sunspot 1021 and 1022

Solar wind
speed: 315.6 km/sec
density: 0.3 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2344 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1 2251 UT Nov08
24-hr: B1 0239 UT Nov08
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

SOLAR ACTIVITY UPDATE: After unleashing one of the brightest X-ray flares in years on Saturday, Nov. 6th, sunspot 1121 took Sunday off. No strong flares were recorded for the rest of the weekend. Nevertheless, the active region's magnetic field is complex and harbors energy for more eruptions. NOAA forecasters estimate an 85% chance of M-flares during the next 24 hours.

NEW COMET IKEYA-MURAKAMI: Newly-discovered comet C/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami) is putting on a good show for anyone with a backyard telescope and an alarm clock. The clock is for getting up before dawn, and the telescope is for seeing this:

comet Ikeya 2010

Leonid Elenin took the picture on Nov. 7th using a robotic telescope in New Mexico. "The comet is rapidly changing," he reports. "The shape of its atmosphere reminds me of Comet Holmes after it had an outburst in 2007."

Indeed, Comet Ikeya-Murakami might be experiencing a similar event. The icy visitor from the outer solar system made its closest approach to the sun (1.7 AU) in late October, so it has recently received a strong dose of solar heating. Ice pockets could be evaporating, comet-caverns collapsing, who knows?

Amateur astronomers are encouraged to monitor developments. Various reports put the brightness of the comet between 7th and 9th magnitude, invisible to the naked eye but an easy target for telescopes such as the Comet Hunter. It's easy to find, too, little more than a degree from Saturn in the eastern sky before dawn. Set your alarm and happy hunting! [Sky maps: Nov 8, 9, 10, 11] [3D orbit] [ephemeris]

more images: from Gil Esquerdo of Whipple Observatory, Mt. Hopkins, Arizona (Nov. 8); from Tenho Tuomi of Lucky Lake, SK, Canada (Nov. 7); from Gregg Ruppel of Ellisville, Missouri (Nov. 7); from Feys Filip of Crete, Greece (Nov. 6); from Gregg Ruppel of Ellisville, Missouri (Nov. 6); from Gregg Ruppel of Ellisville, Missouri (Nov. 5); from Luca Buzzi of the G.V. Schiaparelli Astronomical Observatory in Varese, Italy (Nov. 4);

 

  11-07-10  sunspots 1121 and 1122

Solar wind
speed: 285.3 km/sec
density: 1.1 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2344 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B3
1829 UT Nov07
24-hr: C5 0141 UT Nov07
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

M5 SOLAR FLARE: Active sunspot 1121 has unleashed one of the brightest x-ray solar flares in years, an M5.4-class eruption at 15:36 UT on Nov. 6th. Click on the image to view a movie of the blast from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory:

M5 solar flare

Radiation from the flare created a wave of ionization in Earth's upper atmosphere that altered the propagation of low-frequency radio waves. There was, however, no bright CME (plasma cloud) hurled in our direction, so the event is unlikely to produce auroras in the nights ahead. This is the third M-flare in as many days from this increasingly active sunspot. So far none of the eruptions has been squarely Earth-directed, but this could change in the days ahead as the sun's rotation turns the active region toward our planet.

more images: from Thomas Ashcraft near Santa Fe, New Mexico; from Rogerio Marcon of Campinas SP Brasil; from Robert Arnold of Isle of Skye, Scotland; from James Kevin Ty of Manila, the Philippines;


  11-06-10  sunspot 1112 is back - now numbered 1121

ACTIVE SUNSPOT: NOAA forecasters say there is a 70% chance of M-class solar flares during the next 24 hours. The source of the blast would be active region 1121 emerging over the sun's eastern limb:

sunspot 1121
Image credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory [larger image]

Indeed, AR1121 is already crackling with an M2-flare on Nov. 4th and an M1-flare on Nov. 5th. So far none of the flares has been geo-effective, but this could change as the sun's rotation turns the blast site toward Earth in the days ahead. Readers with solar telescopes are encouraged to monitor developments.

more images: from Rogerio Marcon of Campinas SP Brasil; from Robert Arnold of Isle of Skye, Scotland; from James Kevin Ty of Manila, the Philippines



Solar wind
speed: 288.6 km/sec
density: 0.7 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1556 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: C1 0901 UT Nov06
24-hr: C4 0447 UT Nov06
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1500 UT
  11-5-10  sunspo 1112 now 1121

M5 SOLAR FLARE: Active sunspot 1121 has just unleashed one of the brightest x-ray solar flares in years, an M5.4-class eruption at 15:36 UT on Nov. 6th. Click on the image to view a movie of the blast from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory:

Radiation from the flare created a wave of ionization in Earth's upper atmosphere that altered the propagation of low-frequency radio waves. There was, however, no bright CME (plasma cloud) hurled in our direction, so the event is unlikely to produce auroras in the nights ahead. This is the third M-flare in as many days, and the strongest, from this increasingly active sunspot. So far none of the eruptions has been squarely Earth-directed, but this could change in the days ahead as the sun's rotation turns the active region toward our planet. Now might be a good time to sign up for space weather alerts.

more images: from Thomas Ashcraft near Santa Fe, New Mexico; from Rogerio Marcon of Campinas SP Brasil; from Robert Arnold of Isle of Skye, Scotland; from James Kevin Ty of Manila, the Philippines;

NORTHERN LIGHTS: A minor geomagnetic storm on Nov. 4th made the ice crack in Norway. Actually, it was the weight of the photographer that did it. Ole Christian Salomonsen walked out on the water's frozen surface to get this shot:

 

Solar wind
speed: 297.8 km/sec
density: 0.1 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2344 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: M1
1701 UT Nov06
24-hr: M5
1536 UT Nov06
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT

  11-4-10  sunspot 1112 is back - now numbered 1121
Solar wind
speed: 297.8 km/sec
density: 0.1 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2344 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: M1
1701 UT Nov06
24-hr: M5
1536 UT Nov06
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2300 UT
 
 
Old sunspot 1112 is back, renumbered 1121 for its second pass across the Earth-facing side of the sun. Credit: SDO/HMI. 2-day movie: 7 MB mpg  
 
Sunspot number: 29
What is the sunspot number?
Updated 04 Nov 2010

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 0 days
2010 total: 45 days (15%)
2009 total: 260 days (71%)
Since 2004: 813 days
Typical Solar Min: 486 days

Updated 04 Nov 2010


The Radio Sun
10.7 cm flux: 79 sfu
explanation | more data

Updated 04 Nov 2010

 
Current Auroral Oval:
Switch to: Europe, USA, New Zealand, Antarctica
Credit: NOAA/POES
Planetary K-index
Now: Kp= 0 quiet
24-hr max: Kp= 1 quiet
explanation | more data
Interplanetary Mag. Field
Btotal: 3.1 nT
Bz: 1.4 nT south
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
Coronal Holes: 05 Nov 10
A solar wind stream flowing from the indicated coronal hole could brush past Earth's magnetic field around Nov. 9th. Credit: SDO/AIA.
SPACE WEATHER
NOAA Forecasts
Updated at: 2010 Nov 06 2200 UTC
FLARE
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
CLASS M
85 %
85 %
CLASS X
20 %
20 %
Geomagnetic Storms:
Probabilities for significant disturbances in Earth's magnetic field are given for three activity levels: active, minor storm, severe storm
Updated at: 2010 Nov 06 2200 UTC
Mid-latitudes
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
ACTIVE
10 %
15 %
MINOR
01 %
01 %
SEVERE
01 %
01 %
High latitudes
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
ACTIVE
10 %
20 %
MINOR
01 %
05 %
SEVERE
01 %
01 %
 
  11-3-10  sunspot 1120 is fading

FARSIDE FLARE: An active region just over the sun's eastern horizon is crackling with solar flares and hurling material high above the stellar surface. This extreme ultraviolet movie from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory shows the strongest blast so far, a C4-class event at 1220 UT on Nov. 3rd: 

movie formats: 3.8 MB mpeg, 0.9 MB iPad, 0.3 MB iPhone

Although the blast site is hidden behind the limb, the eruption nevertheless yielded enough x-radiation to produce a wave of ionization in Earth's upper atmosphere. Researcher Rob Stammes recorded a sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) when the wave passed over his lab in Laukvik, Norway. Learn more about SIDs here.

The source of this activity is an old friend--a sunspot and magnetic filament jointly known as "active region 1112." The ensemble put on a good show in mid-October when it first crossed the face of the sun. For the past two weeks, however, it has been transiting the far side, out of sight. Today's eruption may be read as "hello, I'm back." The sun's rotation is bringing the region around for a second pass; readers with solar telescopes are encouraged to monitor the eastern limb for its emergence in the days ahead.



Solar wind
speed: 319.5 km/sec
density: 0.6 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2344 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B5 2125 UT Nov03
24-hr: C4 1220 UT Nov03
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2340 UT
  11-02-2010  sunspot 1120

RETURN OF THE MEGA-FILAMENT: Remember that spectacular mega-filament of magnetism sprawling across the sun's southern hemisphere in October? It's back....almost. For the past 10 days, the filament has been out of sight transiting the farside of the sun. This image from NASA's STEREO-B spacecraft suggests that the magnificent structure is about to return:

STEREO-B is stationed above the sun's eastern limb with a good view of things just over the horizon. The ultraviolet hotspot pictured above is where the filament would be if it is still intact. A continuing series of eruptions like this one might have decimated the structure, leaving it in tatters. We'll find out soon enough. Solar rotation is turning the region toward Earth and it should begin to be visible around Nov. 5th. Readers with solar telescopes are encouraged to monitor developments

Solar wind
speed: 315.3 km/sec
density: 3.4 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 1745 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1
1215 UT Nov02
24-hr: B2
1005 UT Nov02
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 1740 UT

BE ALERT FOR 'HARTLEY-ID' METEORS: If Comet Hartley 2 is going to produce a meteor shower, tonight is the night. According to experts, there is a slim chance that dust from the comet could hit Earth's atmosphere on Nov. 2nd and 3rd, producing a slow flurry of meteors streaming from the constellation Cygnus. If you're out after sunset, be alert for Hartley-ids.


  11-1-02  sunspot 1117 and 1120

Solar wind
speed: 312.7 km/sec
density: 1.2 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2345 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B1 1555 UT Nov01
24-hr: C1 0440 UT Nov01
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2340 UT

RADAR IMAGES OF COMET HARTLEY 2: What is the shape of nearby Comet Hartley 2? On October 24th, astronomers used the giant Arecibo radar to image the comet's core. And the answer is ... "a cross between a bowling pin and a pickle," reports Tim Larson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. According to the radar images, the "pickle" is 2.2 km long and spins around it's short axis once every 18 hours. The Deep Impact (EPOXI) probe will get a closer look on Nov. 4th when it flies by the comet at a distance of only 435 miles. Stay tuned.

COMET UPDATE: Amateur astronomers report that they can once again see Comet Hartley 2 through backyard telescopes as the morning moon fades in brightness. latest images: #1, #2, #3.


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